Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.3389/fnbeh.2014.00271
Title: The neural correlates of the decoy effect in decisions
Authors: Hu, J
Yu, R 
Keywords: adult
anterior cingulate
article
brain depth stimulation
cognition
conflict processing
controlled study
decision making
decoy effect
electroencephalogram
executive function
female
functional magnetic resonance imaging
human
human experiment
inferior parietal gyrus
insula
male
neuroimaging
normal human
occipital gyrus
parietal gyrus
response time
task performance
Issue Date: 2014
Citation: Hu, J, Yu, R (2014). The neural correlates of the decoy effect in decisions. Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience 8 (AUG) : 271. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnbeh.2014.00271
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
Abstract: Human choices are remarkably susceptible to the context in which options are presented. The introduction of an inferior option (a decoy) into the choice set can make one of the original options (the target) more attractive than and the other original option (the competitor). This so called "decoy effect" represents a striking violation of the "contextinvariant" axiom, yet its underlying neural mechanisms are not well understood. Here, we used a novel gambling task in conjunction with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to elucidate its neural basis. At both the stimulus and decision phases, choice sets with decoys activated the occipital gyrus and deactivated the inferior parietal gyrus. At the decision phase, choosing the targets vs. the competitors elicited stronger anterior insula activation, suggesting that perceptual salience drives heuristic decision making in the decoy effect. Moreover, across participants, activity in anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) predicted a reduced susceptibility to the decoy effect, indicating that resisting the tendency to make heuristic decisions is taxing. Our findings highlight the power of the decoy effect in laboratory settings and document the neural mechanisms underlying the decoy effect. © 2014 Hu and Yu.
Source Title: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/181491
ISSN: 16625153
DOI: 10.3389/fnbeh.2014.00271
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
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