Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-14-932
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dc.titleSocioeconomic differences in childhood length/height trajectories in a middle-income country: A cohort study
dc.contributor.authorPatel, R
dc.contributor.authorTilling, K
dc.contributor.authorLawlor, D.A
dc.contributor.authorHowe, L.D
dc.contributor.authorBogdanovich, N
dc.contributor.authorMatush, L
dc.contributor.authorNicoli, E
dc.contributor.authorKramer, M.S
dc.contributor.authorMartin, R.M
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-27T11:05:21Z
dc.date.available2020-10-27T11:05:21Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.citationPatel, R, Tilling, K, Lawlor, D.A, Howe, L.D, Bogdanovich, N, Matush, L, Nicoli, E, Kramer, M.S, Martin, R.M (2014). Socioeconomic differences in childhood length/height trajectories in a middle-income country: A cohort study. BMC Public Health 14 (1) : 932. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-14-932
dc.identifier.issn14712458
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/181488
dc.description.abstractBackground: Socioeconomic disadvantage is associated with shorter adult stature. Few studies have examined socioeconomic differences in stature from birth to childhood and the mechanisms involved, particularly in middle-income former Soviet settings.Methods: The sample included 12,463 Belarusian children (73% of the original cohort) born in 1996-1997, with up to 14 stature measurements from birth to 7 years. Linear spline multi-level models with 3 knots at 3, 12 and 34 months were used to analyse birth length and growth velocity during four age-periods by parental educational achievement (up to secondary school, advanced secondary/partial university, completed university) and occupation (manual, non-manual).Results: Girls born to the most (versus least) educated mothers were 0.43 cm (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.28, 0.58) longer at birth; for boys, the corresponding difference was 0.30 cm (95% CI: 0.15, 0.46). Similarly, children of the most educated mothers grew faster from birth-3 months and 12-34 months (p-values for trend ?0.08), such that, by age 7 years, girls with the most (versus least) educated mothers were 1.92 cm (95% CI: 1.47, 2.36) taller; after controlling for urban/rural and East/West area of residence, this difference remained at 1.86 cm (95% CI: 1.42, 2.31), but after additionally controlling for mid-parental height, attenuated to 1.10 cm (95% CI: 0.69, 1.52). Among boys, these differences were 1.95 cm (95% CI: 1.53, 2.37), 1.89 cm (95% CI: 1.47, 2.31) and 1.16 cm (95% CI: 0.77, 1.55), respectively. Additionally controlling for breastfeeding, maternal smoking and older siblings did not substantively alter these findings. There was no evidence that the association of maternal educational attainment with growth differed in girls compared to boys (p for interaction = 0.45). Results were similar for those born to the most (versus least) educated fathers, or who had a parent with a non-manual (versus manual) occupation.Conclusions: In Belarus, a middle-income former Soviet country, socioeconomic differences in offspring growth commence in the pre-natal period and generate up to approximately 2 cm difference in height at age 7 years. These associations are partly explained by genetic or other factors influencing parental stature. Trial Registration. Current Controlled Trials: NCT01352247 assigned 9 Sept 2005; ClinicalTrials.gov. Identifier: NCT01561612 received 20 Mar 2012. © 2014 Patel et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceUnpaywall 20201031
dc.subjectadult
dc.subjectBelarus
dc.subjectbody height
dc.subjectbreast feeding
dc.subjectchild
dc.subjectcohort analysis
dc.subjectcontrolled study
dc.subjectdeveloping country
dc.subjecteducational status
dc.subjectfemale
dc.subjectgrowth
dc.subjecthealth disparity
dc.subjecthuman
dc.subjectincome
dc.subjectinfant
dc.subjectmale
dc.subjectnewborn
dc.subjectoccupation
dc.subjectparent
dc.subjectpreschool child
dc.subjectrandomized controlled trial
dc.subjectrural population
dc.subjectschool
dc.subjectsmoking
dc.subjectsocioeconomics
dc.subjecturban population
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectBody Height
dc.subjectBreast Feeding
dc.subjectChild
dc.subjectChild, Preschool
dc.subjectCohort Studies
dc.subjectDeveloping Countries
dc.subjectEducational Status
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectGrowth
dc.subjectHealth Status Disparities
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectIncome
dc.subjectInfant
dc.subjectInfant, Newborn
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectOccupations
dc.subjectParents
dc.subjectRepublic of Belarus
dc.subjectRural Population
dc.subjectSchools
dc.subjectSmoking
dc.subjectSocioeconomic Factors
dc.subjectUrban Population
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentDEPT OF OBSTETRICS & GYNAECOLOGY
dc.description.doi10.1186/1471-2458-14-932
dc.description.sourcetitleBMC Public Health
dc.description.volume14
dc.description.issue1
dc.description.page932
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