Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12885-018-4124-0
Title: Body mass index and lung cancer risk: A pooled analysis based on nested case-control studies from four cohort studies
Authors: Sanikini, H
Yuan, J.-M
Butler, L.M
Koh, W.-P 
Gao, Y.-T
Steffen, A
Johansson, M
Vineis, P
Goodman, G.E
Barnett, M.J
Hung, R.J
Chen, C
Stücker, I
Keywords: adult
aged
Article
body height
body mass
body weight
cancer risk
case control study
China
cohort analysis
controlled study
disease association
Europe
female
human
lung cancer
major clinical study
male
middle aged
obesity
Singapore
smoking
underweight
United States
body mass
clinical trial
complication
lung tumor
multicenter study
risk factor
Adult
Aged
Body Mass Index
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity
Overweight
Risk Factors
Smoking
Issue Date: 2018
Citation: Sanikini, H, Yuan, J.-M, Butler, L.M, Koh, W.-P, Gao, Y.-T, Steffen, A, Johansson, M, Vineis, P, Goodman, G.E, Barnett, M.J, Hung, R.J, Chen, C, Stücker, I (2018). Body mass index and lung cancer risk: A pooled analysis based on nested case-control studies from four cohort studies. BMC Cancer 18 (1) : 220. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12885-018-4124-0
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
Abstract: Background: Obesity has been proposed as a potential protective factor against lung cancer. We examined the association between BMI and lung cancer risk in a pooled analysis based on nested case-control studies from four cohort studies. Methods: A case-control study was nested within four cohorts in USA, Europe, China and Singapore that included 4172 cases and 8471 control subjects. BMI at baseline was calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared (kg/m2), and classified into 4 categories: underweight (BMI <18.5), normal weight (18.5?BMI <25), overweight (25?BMI <30) and obese (?30). Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for BMI-lung cancer associations were estimated using unconditional logistic regression, adjusting for potential confounders. Results: Considering all participants, and using normal weight as the reference group, a decreased risk of lung cancer was observed for those who were overweight (OR 0.77, 95% CI: 0.68-0.86) and obese (OR 0.69, 95% CI: 0.59-0.82). In the stratified analysis by smoking status, the decreased risk for lung cancer was observed among current, former and never smokers (P for interaction 0.002). The adjusted ORs for overweight and obese groups were 0.79 (95% CI: 0.68-0.92) and 0.75 (95% CI: 0.60-0.93) for current smokers, 0.70 (95% CI: 0.53-0.93) and 0.55 (95% CI: 0.37-0.80) for former smokers, 0.77 (95% CI: 0.59-0.99), and 0.71 (95% CI: 0.44-1.14) for never smokers, respectively. While no statistically significant association was observed for underweight subjects who were current smokers (OR 1.24, 95% CI: 0.98-1.58), former smokers (OR 0.27, 95% CI: 0.12-0.61) and never smokers (OR 0.83, 95% CI: 0.5.-1.28). Conclusion: The results of this study provide additional evidence that obesity is associated with a decreased risk of lung cancer. Further biological studies are needed to address this association. © 2018 The Author(s).
Source Title: BMC Cancer
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/181214
ISSN: 14712407
DOI: 10.1186/s12885-018-4124-0
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
Appears in Collections:Elements
Staff Publications

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormatAccess SettingsVersion 
10_1186_s12885-018-4124-0.pdf651.78 kBAdobe PDF

OPEN

NoneView/Download

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

11
checked on Oct 23, 2021

Page view(s)

78
checked on Oct 21, 2021

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons