Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1111/codi.14293
Title: The colorectal surgeon's personality may influence the rectal anastomotic decision
Authors: Moug, S.J
Henderson, N
Tiernan, J
Keywords: adult
aged
alexithymia
Article
bleeding
case report
chemoradiotherapy
clinical article
comorbidity
decision making
diverticulosis
emergency surgery
emotional stability
England
extraversion
female
gout
human
hypertension
ischemic heart disease
laparotomy
learning disorder
major clinical study
male
medical history
mesenteric artery
nuclear magnetic resonance imaging
osteoarthritis
personality
personality test
priority journal
problem behavior
rectum anastomosis
rectum cancer
rectum surgery
rectum tumor
sigmoid volvulus
stoma
surgeon
United Kingdom
very elderly
Issue Date: 2018
Citation: Moug, S.J, Henderson, N, Tiernan, J (2018). The colorectal surgeon's personality may influence the rectal anastomotic decision. Colorectal Disease 20 (11) : 970-980. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1111/codi.14293
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
Abstract: Aim: Colorectal surgeons regularly make the decision to anastomose, defunction or form an end colostomy when performing rectal surgery. This study aimed to define personality traits of colorectal surgeons and explore any influence of such traits on the decision to perform a rectal anastomosis. Method: Fifty attendees of The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland 2016 Conference participated. After written consent, all underwent personality testing: alexithymia (inability to understand emotions), type of thinking process (intuitive versus rational) and personality traits (extraversion, agreeableness, openness, emotional stability, conscientiousness). Questions were answered regarding anastomotic decisions in various clinical scenarios and results analysed to reveal any influence of the surgeon's personality on anastomotic decision. Results: Participants were: male (86%), consultants (84%) and based in England (68%). Alexithymia was low (4%) with 81% displaying intuitive thinking (reflex, fast). Participants scored higher in emotional stability (ability to remain calm) and conscientiousness (organized, methodical) compared with population norms. Personality traits influenced the next anastomotic decision if: surgeons had recently received criticism at a departmental audit meeting; were operating with an anaesthetist that was not their regular one; or there had been no anastomotic leaks in their patients for over 1 year. Conclusion: Colorectal surgeons have speciality relevant personalities that potentially influence the important decision to anastomose and could explain the variation in surgical practice across the UK. Future work should explore these findings in other countries and any link of personality traits to patient-related outcomes. © 2018 The Authors. Colorectal Disease published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.
Source Title: Colorectal Disease
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/181173
ISSN: 14628910
DOI: 10.1111/codi.14293
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
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