Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.3201/eid2010.131768
Title: Influenza-associated hospitalizations, Singapore, 2004-2008 and 2010-2012
Authors: Ang, L.W
Lim, C
Jian Ming Lee, V 
Ma, S 
Tiong, W.W
Ooi, P.L
Tzer Pin Lin, R 
James, L
Cutter, J 
Keywords: adolescent
adult
aged
Article
child
hospitalization
human
infant
influenza A (H3N2)
influenza B
Influenza virus A H1N1
newborn
nonhuman
preschool child
real time polymerase chain reaction
reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction
school child
seasonal influenza
Singapore
young adult
aging
hospitalization
Influenza, Human
middle aged
risk factor
statistics and numerical data
time
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aging
Child
Child, Preschool
Hospitalization
Humans
Infant
Influenza, Human
Middle Aged
Risk Factors
Singapore
Time Factors
Young Adult
Issue Date: 2014
Publisher: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
Citation: Ang, L.W, Lim, C, Jian Ming Lee, V, Ma, S, Tiong, W.W, Ooi, P.L, Tzer Pin Lin, R, James, L, Cutter, J (2014). Influenza-associated hospitalizations, Singapore, 2004-2008 and 2010-2012. Emerging Infectious Diseases 20 (10) : 1652-1660. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.3201/eid2010.131768
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
Abstract: Studies of influenza-associated hospitalizations in tropical settings are lacking. To increase understanding of the effect of influenza in Singapore, we estimated the agespecific influenza-associated hospitalizations for pneumonia and influenza during 2004-2008 and 2010-2012. The rate of hospitalization was 28.3/100,000 person-years during 2004-2008 and 29.6/100,000 person-years during 2010-2012. The age-specific influenza-associated hospitalization rates followed a J-shaped pattern: rates in persons >75 years of age and in children <6 months of age were >47 times and >26 times higher, respectively, than those for persons 25-44 years of age. Across all ages during these 2 study periods, ?12% of the hospitalizations for pneumonia and influenza were attributable to influenza. The rates and proportions of hospitalizations attributable to influenza, particularly among the very young and the elderly, are considerable in Singapore and highlight the importance of vaccination in protecting populations at risk. © 2014, Emerging Infectious Diseases. All rights reserved.
Source Title: Emerging Infectious Diseases
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/180163
ISSN: 1080-6040
DOI: 10.3201/eid2010.131768
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
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