Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000001519
Title: Parental attitudes and factors associated with varicella vaccination in preschool and schoolchildren in Hong Kong: A cross-sectional study
Authors: Tam, W.W.S 
Chan, J
Lo, K.K.H
Lee, A
Chan, P.K.S
Chan, D
Nelson, E.A.S
Keywords: chickenpox vaccine
Article
attitude to health
chickenpox
child
controlled study
cross-sectional study
demography
educational status
female
health belief
Hong Kong
human
income
kindergarten
major clinical study
male
medical history
multicenter study
parental attitude
preschool child
primary school
priority journal
randomized controlled trial
school child
social status
vaccination
attitude to health
chickenpox
cultural anthropology
parent
procedures
psychology
randomization
socioeconomics
statistics and numerical data
Attitude to Health
Chickenpox
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Culture
Demography
Female
Hong Kong
Humans
Male
Parents
Random Allocation
Socioeconomic Factors
Vaccination
Issue Date: 2015
Publisher: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins
Citation: Tam, W.W.S, Chan, J, Lo, K.K.H, Lee, A, Chan, P.K.S, Chan, D, Nelson, E.A.S (2015). Parental attitudes and factors associated with varicella vaccination in preschool and schoolchildren in Hong Kong: A cross-sectional study. Medicine (United States) 94 (36) : e1519. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000001519
Rights: Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
Abstract: This study investigates parental attitudes and factors associated with varicella vaccination among preschool and schoolchildren prior to introduction of the vaccine into Hong Kong's universal Childhood Immunization Program. Fourteen kindergartens and 5 primary schools in Hong Kong were randomly selected in 2013. Parents of the students were invited to answer the self-administered questionnaires. Acquired information included demographic characteristics and socioeconomic statuses of families, children's history of chickenpox infection and vaccination, and reasons for getting children vaccinated. Logistic regression was applied to examine the factors associated with vaccination. From the 3484 completed questionnaires, the calculated rates of varicella infection and vaccination were 20.7% and 69.0%, respectively. Barriers to vaccination included parental uncertainties about vaccine effectiveness, lack of recommendation from the government, and concerns on adverse effects. Overall, 71.8%, 69.0%, and 45.7% of the parents rated family doctors, specialists, and the government, respectively, as very important motivators of vaccination. Higher parental educational level and family income, better perceived knowledge of varicella and chance of infection, discussion with a family doctor, and positive health belief towards vaccination were associated with vaccination (all P<0.05). The rate of vaccination in Hong Kong was higher than that of some other countries that also did not include the vaccine in their routine immunization programs. More positive parental attitudes, higher socioeconomic status, and discussion with a family doctor are associated with greater vaccination rates. The important roles that health professionals and the government play in promoting varicella vaccination were emphasized. Copyright © 2015 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.
Source Title: Medicine (United States)
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/180106
ISSN: 0025-7974
DOI: 10.1097/MD.0000000000001519
Rights: Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
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