Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1038/srep37126
Title: Allostasis in health and food addiction
Authors: De Ridder, D
Manning, P 
Leong, S.L
Ross, S
Vanneste, S
Keywords: adult
allostasis
brain
electroencephalogram
electroencephalography
female
food addiction
human
male
middle aged
obesity
pathophysiology
pleasure
withdrawal syndrome
Adult
Allostasis
Brain
Brain Waves
Electroencephalography
Female
Food Addiction
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity
Pleasure
Substance Withdrawal Syndrome
Issue Date: 2016
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Citation: De Ridder, D, Manning, P, Leong, S.L, Ross, S, Vanneste, S (2016). Allostasis in health and food addiction. Scientific Reports 6 : 37126. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1038/srep37126
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
Abstract: Homeostasis is the basis of modern medicine and allostasis, a further elaboration of homeostasis, has been defined as stability through change, which was later modified to predictive reference resetting. It has been suggested that pleasure is related to salience (behavioral relevance), and withdrawal has been linked to allostasis in addictive types. The question arises how the clinical and neural signatures of pleasure, salience, allostasis and withdrawal relate, both in a non-addicted and addicted state. Resting state EEGs were performed in 66 people, involving a food-addicted obese group, a non-food addicted obese group and a lean control group. Correlation analyses were performed on behavioral data, and correlation, comparative and conjunction analyses were performed to extract electrophysiological relationships between pleasure, salience, allostasis and withdrawal. Pleasure/liking seems to be the phenomenological expression that enough salient stimuli are obtained, and withdrawal can be seen as a motivational incentive because due to allostatic reference resetting, more stimuli are required. In addition, in contrast to non-addiction, a pathological, non-adaptive salience attached to food results in withdrawal mediated through persistent allostatic reference resetting. © The Author(s) 2016.
Source Title: Scientific Reports
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/179785
ISSN: 2045-2322
DOI: 10.1038/srep37126
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
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