Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms14905
Title: Quantitative 3D analysis of complex single border cell behaviors in coordinated collective cell migration
Authors: Cliffe, A
Doupé, D.P
Sung, H
Lim, I.K.H
Ong, K.H
Cheng, L 
Yu, W
Keywords: cancer
cells and cell components
developmental biology
fly
genetic marker
three-dimensional modeling
cell function
cell migration
Drosophila
human
human cell
image analysis
insect cell culture
motion
nonhuman
quantitative study
running
animal
cell motion
cell tracking
confocal microscopy
cytology
female
image processing
oocyte
ovary
physiology
procedures
rotation
three dimensional imaging
Animals
Cell Movement
Cell Tracking
Drosophila
Female
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
Imaging, Three-Dimensional
Microscopy, Confocal
Oocytes
Ovary
Rotation
Issue Date: 2017
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Citation: Cliffe, A, Doupé, D.P, Sung, H, Lim, I.K.H, Ong, K.H, Cheng, L, Yu, W (2017). Quantitative 3D analysis of complex single border cell behaviors in coordinated collective cell migration. Nature Communications 8 : 14905. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms14905
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
Abstract: Understanding the mechanisms of collective cell migration is crucial for cancer metastasis, wound healing and many developmental processes. Imaging a migrating cluster in vivo is feasible, but the quantification of individual cell behaviours remains challenging. We have developed an image analysis toolkit, CCMToolKit, to quantify the Drosophila border cell system. In addition to chaotic motion, previous studies reported that the migrating cells are able to migrate in a highly coordinated pattern. We quantify the rotating and running migration modes in 3D while also observing a range of intermediate behaviours. Running mode is driven by cluster external protrusions. Rotating mode is associated with cluster internal cell extensions that could not be easily characterized. Although the cluster moves slower while rotating, individual cells retain their mobility and are in fact slightly more active than in running mode. We also show that individual cells may exchange positions during migration. © 2017 The Author(s).
Source Title: Nature Communications
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/179724
ISSN: 2041-1723
DOI: 10.1038/ncomms14905
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
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