Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1111/jsr.12424
Title: Sleep restriction can attenuate prioritization benefits on declarative memory consolidation
Authors: Lo, J.C 
Bennion, K.A
Chee, M.W.L 
Keywords: adolescent
adult
Article
clinical article
controlled clinical trial
controlled study
declarative memory
female
follow up
human
latent period
long term memory
male
memory consolidation
mental performance
polysomnography
priority journal
recall
REM sleep
sleep deprivation
sleep time
wakefulness
memory consolidation
pathophysiology
physiology
psychology
randomized controlled trial
reading
sleep
sleep deprivation
time factor
young adult
Adolescent
Female
Humans
Male
Memory Consolidation
Mental Recall
Polysomnography
Reading
Sleep
Sleep Deprivation
Time Factors
Young Adult
Issue Date: 2016
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing Ltd
Citation: Lo, J.C, Bennion, K.A, Chee, M.W.L (2016). Sleep restriction can attenuate prioritization benefits on declarative memory consolidation. Journal of Sleep Research 25 (6) : 664-672. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1111/jsr.12424
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
Abstract: As chronic sleep restriction is a widespread problem among adolescents, the present study investigated the effects of a 1-week sleep restriction (SR) versus control period on the consolidation of long-term memory for prose passages. We also determined whether the benefit of prioritization on memory is modulated by adequate sleep occurring during consolidation. Fifty-six healthy adolescents (25 male, aged 15–19 years) were instructed to remember a prose passage in which half of the content was highlighted (prioritized), and were told that they would receive an additional bonus for remembering highlighted content. Following an initial free recall test, participants underwent a 7-night period in which they received either a 5-h (SR) or 9-h (control) nightly sleep opportunity, monitored by polysomnography on selected nights. Free recall of the passage was tested at the end of the sleep manipulation period (1 week after encoding), and again 6 weeks after encoding. Recall of highlighted content was superior to that of non-highlighted content at all three time-points (initial, 1 week, 6 weeks). This beneficial effect of prioritization on memory was stronger 1 week relative to a few minutes after encoding for the control, but not the SR group. N3 duration was similar in the control and SR groups. Overall, the present study shows that the benefits of prioritization on memory are enhanced over time, requiring time and sleep to unfold fully. Partial sleep deprivation (i.e. 5-h nocturnal sleep opportunity) may attenuate such benefits, but this may be offset by preservation of N3 sleep duration. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Sleep Research published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Sleep Research Society.
Source Title: Journal of Sleep Research
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/179276
ISSN: 0962-1105
DOI: 10.1111/jsr.12424
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
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