Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1038/srep22678
DC FieldValue
dc.titleThe development of the asymmetrically dominated decoy effect in young children
dc.contributor.authorZhen, S
dc.contributor.authorYu, R
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-22T03:05:56Z
dc.date.available2020-10-22T03:05:56Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationZhen, S, Yu, R (2016). The development of the asymmetrically dominated decoy effect in young children. Scientific Reports 6 : 22678. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1038/srep22678
dc.identifier.issn20452322
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/178937
dc.description.abstractOne classic example of context-independent violations is the asymmetrically dominated decoy effect, in which adding a decoy option (inferior option) to a set of original options often increases the individual's preference for one option over the other original option. Despite the prevalence of this effect, little is known about its developmental origins. Moreover, it remains contentious whether the decoy effect is a result of biological evolution or is learned from social experience. Here, we investigated the decoy effect in 3-to 7-year-old children (n = 175) and young adults (n = 52) using a simple perceptual task. Results showed that older children (5-year-olds and 7-year-olds), but not younger children (3-year-olds), exhibited a decoy effect. Nevertheless, children as young as age 5 exhibited a decoy effect that was not significantly different from that shown by young adults. These findings suggest that humans start to appreciate the relative values of options at around age 5.
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceUnpaywall 20201031
dc.subjectadult
dc.subjectchild
dc.subjecthuman
dc.subjectmajor clinical study
dc.subjectyoung adult
dc.subjectaging
dc.subjectchild development
dc.subjectclinical trial
dc.subjectdecision making
dc.subjectfemale
dc.subjectmale
dc.subjectphysiology
dc.subjectpreschool child
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectAging
dc.subjectChild
dc.subjectChild Development
dc.subjectChild, Preschool
dc.subjectDecision Making
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectMale
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentDEPT OF PSYCHOLOGY
dc.description.doi10.1038/srep22678
dc.description.sourcetitleScientific Reports
dc.description.volume6
dc.description.page22678
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