Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-05219-x
Title: Direct and convenient measurement of plasmid stability in lab and clinical isolates of E. coli
Authors: Chen, S 
Larsson, M
Robinson, R.C 
Chen, S.L 
Keywords: bacterial DNA
chloramphenicol
antibiotic resistance
bacterial genome
DNA replication
drug effect
Escherichia coli
genetics
growth, development and aging
plasmid
Chloramphenicol
DNA Replication
DNA, Bacterial
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Escherichia coli
Genome, Bacterial
Plasmids
Issue Date: 2017
Citation: Chen, S, Larsson, M, Robinson, R.C, Chen, S.L (2017). Direct and convenient measurement of plasmid stability in lab and clinical isolates of E. coli. Scientific Reports 7 (1) : 4788. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-05219-x
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
Abstract: Plasmids are important mobile elements in bacteria, contributing to evolution, virulence, and antibiotic resistance. Natural plasmids are generally large and maintained at low copy number and thus prone to be lost. Therefore, dedicated plasmid maintenance systems have evolved, leading to plasmid loss rates as low as 1 per 107 divisions. These low rates complicate studies of plasmid loss, as traditional techniques for measuring plasmid loss are laborious and not quantitative. To overcome these limitations, we leveraged a stringent negative selection system to develop a method for performing direct, quantitative measurements of plasmid loss in E. coli. We applied our method to gain mechanistic insights into a heterologously reconstituted segregation system in lab strains and clinical isolates of E. coli. We also performed direct stability studies of a currently circulating resistance plasmid in a clinical isolate, strain EC958, which is a member of the rapidly expanding global ST131 E. coli clone. Our results establish the foundational assays required to screen for small molecules targeting plasmid stability, which could complement current strategies for reducing the spread of antibiotic resistance, complementing other strategies for treating antibiotic resistant bacteria. © 2017 The Author(s).
Source Title: Scientific Reports
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/178316
ISSN: 20452322
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-05219-x
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
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