Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-07668-w
Title: Molecular identification of spiders preying on Empoasca vitis in a tea plantation
Authors: Yang, T.-B
Liu, J
Yuan, L.-Y
Zhang, Y
Li, D.-Q 
Agnarsson, I
Chen, J
Keywords: adult
article
biological pest control
canopy
Empoasca
female
gastrointestinal tract
human
human experiment
jumping
major clinical study
male
nonhuman
pest organism
plantation
polymerase chain reaction
predator
quantitative analysis
spider
tea
Vitis
animal
Camellia sinensis
classification
DNA barcoding
genetics
Hemiptera
parasitology
physiology
predation
procedures
spider
Animals
Camellia sinensis
DNA Barcoding, Taxonomic
Hemiptera
Pest Control, Biological
Predatory Behavior
Spiders
Issue Date: 2017
Citation: Yang, T.-B, Liu, J, Yuan, L.-Y, Zhang, Y, Li, D.-Q, Agnarsson, I, Chen, J (2017). Molecular identification of spiders preying on Empoasca vitis in a tea plantation. Scientific Reports 7 (1) : 7784. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-07668-w
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
Abstract: Biological control using predators of key pest species is an attractive option in integrated pest management (IPM). Molecular gut analysis can provide an estimation of predator efficiency on a given prey. Here we use a combination of various experimental approaches, both in field and lab, to identify a potential biological control species of the common pest of commercially grown tea, Empoasca vitis (Göthe) (Hemiptera), in a Chinese plantation. We collected 2655 spiders from plantations and established relative abundances of spider species and their temporal overlap with the pest species in tea canopy. We analyzed DNA from 1363 individuals of the most common spider species using targeted RQ-PCR to quantify the potential efficiency of spiders as a predator on E. vitis. The results showed that, in the field, the jumping spider Evarcha albaria was the most abundant, had the closest temporal overlap with the pest, and frequently fed on it. Therefore, this spider may play a key role in pest suppression. The present study demonstrates the potential of our experimental approach to study predator-prey relationships in taxa that do not lend themselves to morphological identification of gut contents, such as spiders. © 2017, The Author(s).
Source Title: Scientific Reports
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/178285
ISSN: 20452322
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-07668-w
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
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