Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1038/msb.2012.59
Title: RNAi screening reveals a large signaling network controlling the Golgi apparatus in human cells
Authors: Chia, J
Goh, G
Racine, V
Ng, S
Kumar, P
Bard, F 
Keywords: actin
glycan
mitogen activated protein kinase
myosin
phosphatidylinositide
small interfering RNA
lectin
myosin adenosine triphosphatase
phosphatase
polysaccharide
protein kinase
actin myosin interaction
article
bioinformatics
carbohydrate metabolism
female
gene regulatory network
genetic screening
Golgi complex
HeLa cell
human
human cell
human cell culture
morphology
phenotype
priority journal
RNA interference
biology
biosynthesis
cell cycle
chemistry
fluorescence microscopy
fluorescent antibody technique
gene expression regulation
genetics
glycosylation
image processing
metabolism
pilot study
reproducibility
signal transduction
Actomyosin
Cell Cycle
Computational Biology
Fluorescent Antibody Technique
Gene Expression Regulation
Glycosylation
Golgi Apparatus
HeLa Cells
Humans
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
Lectins
Microscopy, Fluorescence
Phenotype
Phosphoric Monoester Hydrolases
Pilot Projects
Polysaccharides
Protein Kinases
Reproducibility of Results
RNA Interference
Signal Transduction
Issue Date: 2012
Publisher: EMBO Press
Citation: Chia, J, Goh, G, Racine, V, Ng, S, Kumar, P, Bard, F (2012). RNAi screening reveals a large signaling network controlling the Golgi apparatus in human cells. Molecular Systems Biology 8 : 629. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1038/msb.2012.59
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
Abstract: The Golgi apparatus has many important physiological functions, including sorting of secretory cargo and biosynthesis of complex glycans. These functions depend on the intricate and compartmentalized organization of the Golgi apparatus. To investigate the mechanisms that regulate Golgi architecture, we developed a quantitative morphological assay using three different Golgi compartment markers and quantitative image analysis, and performed a kinome- and phosphatome-wide RNAi screen in HeLa cells. Depletion of 159 signaling genes, nearly 20% of genes assayed, induced strong and varied perturbations in Golgi morphology. Using bioinformatics data, a large regulatory network could be constructed. Specific subnetworks are involved in phosphoinositides regulation, acto-myosin dynamics and mitogen activated protein kinase signaling. Most gene depletion also affected Golgi functions, in particular glycan biosynthesis, suggesting that signaling cascades can control glycosylation directly at the Golgi level. Our results provide a genetic overview of the signaling pathways that control the Golgi apparatus in human cells. © 2012 EMBO and Macmillan Publishers Limited.
Source Title: Molecular Systems Biology
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/178155
ISSN: 1744-4292
DOI: 10.1038/msb.2012.59
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
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