Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.15252/emmm.201707885
Title: Co-infection with Chikungunya virus alters trafficking of pathogenic CD8+ T cells into the brain and prevents Plasmodium-induced neuropathology
Authors: Teo, T.-H
Howland, S.W
Claser, C
Gun, S.Y
Poh, C.M
Lee, W.W.L
Lum, F.-M
Ng, L.F.P 
Rénia, L 
Keywords: chemokine receptor CXCR3
CXCL9 chemokine
gamma interferon
gamma interferon inducible protein 10
leukosialin
animal experiment
animal model
animal tissue
Article
blood brain barrier
CD8+ T lymphocyte
cerebral malaria
Chikungunya virus
controlled study
cross presentation
cytokine production
female
infection sensitivity
lymphocyte migration
male
mixed infection
mortality rate
mouse
neuropathology
nonhuman
Plasmodium
Plasmodium berghei infection
priority journal
protein expression
animal
brain
C57BL mouse
CD8+ T lymphocyte
cell motion
chikungunya
Chikungunya virus
mixed infection
neuropathology
parasitology
pathology
physiology
Plasmodium berghei
protection
virology
Animals
Brain
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes
Cell Movement
Chikungunya Fever
Chikungunya virus
Coinfection
Female
Malaria, Cerebral
Male
Mice
Mice, Inbred C57BL
Neuropathology
Plasmodium berghei
Protective Factors
Issue Date: 2018
Citation: Teo, T.-H, Howland, S.W, Claser, C, Gun, S.Y, Poh, C.M, Lee, W.W.L, Lum, F.-M, Ng, L.F.P, Rénia, L (2018). Co-infection with Chikungunya virus alters trafficking of pathogenic CD8+ T cells into the brain and prevents Plasmodium-induced neuropathology. EMBO Molecular Medicine 10 (1) : 121-138. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.15252/emmm.201707885
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
Abstract: Arboviral diseases have risen significantly over the last 40 years, increasing the risk of co-infection with other endemic disease such as malaria. However, nothing is known about the impact arboviruses have on the host response toward heterologous pathogens during co-infection. Here, we investigate the effects of Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) co-infection on the susceptibility and severity of malaria infection. Using the Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA) experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) model, we show that concurrent co-infection induced the most prominent changes in ECM manifestation. Concurrent co-infection protected mice from ECM mortality without affecting parasite development in the blood. This protection was mediated by the alteration of parasite-specific CD8+ T-cell trafficking through an IFN?-mediated mechanism. Co-infection with CHIKV induced higher splenic IFN? levels that lead to high local levels of CXCL9 and CXCL10. This induced retention of CXCR3-expressing pathogenic CD8+ T cells in the spleen and prevented their migration to the brain. This then averts all downstream pathogenic events such as parasite sequestration in the brain and disruption of blood–brain barrier that prevents ECM-induced mortality in co-infected mice. © 2017 Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR). Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license
Source Title: EMBO Molecular Medicine
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/178125
ISSN: 17574676
DOI: 10.15252/emmm.201707885
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
Appears in Collections:Elements
Staff Publications

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormatAccess SettingsVersion 
10_15252_emmm_201707885.pdf2.93 MBAdobe PDF

OPEN

NoneView/Download

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

6
checked on Apr 15, 2021

Page view(s)

38
checked on Apr 16, 2021

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons