Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/175764
Title: THE ORAL READING BEHAVIOUR IN ENGLISH OF PRIMARY FOUR PUPILS IN SINGAPORE
Authors: CHAN LAI PENG
Issue Date: 1989
Citation: CHAN LAI PENG (1989). THE ORAL READING BEHAVIOUR IN ENGLISH OF PRIMARY FOUR PUPILS IN SINGAPORE. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: This study looks at reading as a psycholinguistic process, and the reader as a user of three sources of information graphophonic, syntactic, and semantic and at least four reading strategies - sampling, predicting, confirming, and correcting to negotiate meaning with the author. This reader-author interaction often produces miscues or oral deviations from print, and which when examined, reveal the process through which the reader attempted to reconstruct the author's meaning. The subjects involved Primary Four Normal Course pupils in the study were 36 from a Singapore government school, and whose home language was often not English. The study aimed to look at the miscues of these children in order that their oral reading behaviour in English may be identified. The subjects' reading of both fiction and non-fiction were recorded and analysed using an adaptation of Y.Goodman and Burke's (1972) Reading Miscue Inventory. Informal interviews were also carried out with the English Language teachers of the subjects. Three objectives guided the study i) to provide a quantitative and qualitative description of the subjects' oral reading behaviour; ii) to determine how competent the subjects were strategies; and iii) to ascertain at the using their reading effect of ability, text type, and sex on subjects' reading and retelling. The analysis showed that subjects processed print the same way native-English speakers and speakers of other languages reading English did. It was also found that they made use of the graphophonic cueing system more often than they did the syntactic and semantic systems. They were, however, not always word-bound and did try to predict their way through written text, sampling larger language meaning units as evidenced in more than half of their miscues not causing any distortion to the author's meaning. Findings also showed that most of the subjects were successful in applying their reading strategies. None of the subjects read or reviewed so badly that he was labelled as "ineffective" in employing the strategies. Comparison of the performance of the ability groups revealed that the higher proficiency pupils consistently made more contextually acceptable and meaningful miscues than did the lower proficiency pupils. They also handled their retelling better than the weaker readers, resulting in a significant difference in the retelling scores of the ability groups for non-fiction. Only a slight difference existed in the reading of the two genres. There was, however, an indication that the subjects found non-fiction more accessible, generating more syntactically and semantically appropriate miscues that led to no comprehension loss when they read non-fiction than when they read fiction. A significant difference was also found in the retelling scores following the reading of the genres. The effect sex had on the subjects’ performance was minimal. The boys seemed to have produced more contextually appropriate miscues and a higher percentage of miscues that retained the author’s meaning than did the girls. Both sexes fared equally well for the retelling; the boys were better at reviewing non-fiction; the girls at fiction.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/175764
Appears in Collections:Master's Theses (Restricted)

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