Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.3201/eid2101.140042
DC FieldValue
dc.titleAssociation of melioidosis incidence with rainfall and humidity, Singapore, 2003–2012
dc.contributor.authorLiu, X
dc.contributor.authorPang, L
dc.contributor.authorSim, S.H
dc.contributor.authorGoh, K.T
dc.contributor.authorRavikumar, S
dc.contributor.authorWin, M.S
dc.contributor.authorTan, G
dc.contributor.authorCook, A.R
dc.contributor.authorFisher, D
dc.contributor.authorChai, L.Y.A
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-09T07:21:51Z
dc.date.available2020-09-09T07:21:51Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationLiu, X, Pang, L, Sim, S.H, Goh, K.T, Ravikumar, S, Win, M.S, Tan, G, Cook, A.R, Fisher, D, Chai, L.Y.A (2015). Association of melioidosis incidence with rainfall and humidity, Singapore, 2003–2012. Emerging Infectious Diseases 21 (1) : 159-162. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.3201/eid2101.140042
dc.identifier.issn1080-6040
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/175298
dc.description.abstractSoil has been considered the natural reservoir for the bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei, which causes melioidosis. We examined 550 melioidosis cases that occurred during a 10-year period in the highly urbanized city of Singapore, where soil exposure is rare, and found that rainfall and humidity levels were associated with disease incidence. © 2015, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). All rights reserved.
dc.publisherCenters for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
dc.sourceUnpaywall 20200831
dc.subjectrain
dc.subjectrain
dc.subjectadult
dc.subjectArticle
dc.subjectBurkholderia pseudomallei
dc.subjectcorrelation analysis
dc.subjectfemale
dc.subjectgeographic distribution
dc.subjecthuman
dc.subjecthumidity
dc.subjectincidence
dc.subjectmajor clinical study
dc.subjectmale
dc.subjectmelioidosis
dc.subjectmortality
dc.subjectseasonal variation
dc.subjectserology
dc.subjectSingapore
dc.subjectsurface soil
dc.subjecttemperature
dc.subjecthumidity
dc.subjectmelioidosis
dc.subjectmiddle aged
dc.subjectproportional hazards model
dc.subjectseason
dc.subjecturban population
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectHumidity
dc.subjectIncidence
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMelioidosis
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectProportional Hazards Models
dc.subjectRain
dc.subjectSeasons
dc.subjectSingapore
dc.subjectUrban Population
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentSAW SWEE HOCK SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
dc.contributor.departmentDEPT OF MEDICINE
dc.description.doi10.3201/eid2101.140042
dc.description.sourcetitleEmerging Infectious Diseases
dc.description.volume21
dc.description.issue1
dc.description.page159-162
dc.published.statePublished
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications
Elements

Show simple item record
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormatAccess SettingsVersion 
10_3201_eid2101_140042.pdf1.14 MBAdobe PDF

OPEN

NoneView/Download

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

38
checked on Jun 20, 2022

Page view(s)

158
checked on Jun 23, 2022

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.