Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1038/srep24892
Title: Negative incidental emotions augment fairness sensitivity
Authors: Liu C.
Chai J.W.
Yu R. 
Keywords: anger
attention
consensus development
decision making
disgust
fear
happiness
human
human experiment
sadness
adolescent
adult
decision making
emotion
female
male
psychological model
young adult
Adolescent
Adult
Decision Making
Emotions
Female
Humans
Male
Models, Psychological
Young Adult
Issue Date: 2016
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Citation: Liu C., Chai J.W., Yu R. (2016). Negative incidental emotions augment fairness sensitivity. Scientific Reports 6 : 24892. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1038/srep24892
Abstract: Previous studies have shown that task-unrelated emotions induced incidentally exert carryover effects on individuals' subsequent decisions in financial negotiations. However, the specificity of these emotion effects are not clear. In three experiments, we systematically investigated the role of seven transiently induced basic emotions (disgust, sadness, anger, fear, happiness, surprise and neutral) on rejection of unfair offers using the ultimatum game. We found that all negative emotions (disgust, sadness, anger and fear), but not happiness or surprise, significantly increased rejection rates, suggesting that the effect of incidental negative emotions on fairness is not specific to the type of negative emotion. Our findings highlight the role of fleeting emotions in biasing decision-making processes and suggest that all incidental negative emotions exert similar effects on fairness sensitivity, possibly by potentiating attention towards negative aspects of the situation.
Source Title: Scientific Reports
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/174975
ISSN: 20452322
DOI: 10.1038/srep24892
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