Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.3389/fnbeh.2016.00082
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dc.titleTo cheat or not to cheat: Tryptophan hydroxylase 2 SNP variants contribute to dishonest behavior
dc.contributor.authorShen Q.
dc.contributor.authorTeo M.
dc.contributor.authorWinter E.
dc.contributor.authorHart E.
dc.contributor.authorChew S.H.
dc.contributor.authorEbstein R.P.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-04T02:04:51Z
dc.date.available2020-09-04T02:04:51Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationShen Q., Teo M., Winter E., Hart E., Chew S.H., Ebstein R.P. (2016). To cheat or not to cheat: Tryptophan hydroxylase 2 SNP variants contribute to dishonest behavior. Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience 10 (MAY) : 82. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnbeh.2016.00082
dc.identifier.issn16625153
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/174257
dc.description.abstractAlthough, lying (bear false witness) is explicitly prohibited in the Decalogue and a focus of interest in philosophy and theology, more recently the behavioral and neural mechanisms of deception are gaining increasing attention from diverse fields especially economics, psychology, and neuroscience. Despite the considerable role of heredity in explaining individual differences in deceptive behavior, few studies have investigated which specific genes contribute to the heterogeneity of lying behavior across individuals. Also, little is known concerning which specific neurotransmitter pathways underlie deception. Toward addressing these two key questions, we implemented a neurogenetic strategy and modeled deception by an incentivized die-under-cup task in a laboratory setting. The results of this exploratory study provide provisional evidence that SNP variants across the tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2) gene, that encodes the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of brain serotonin, contribute to individual differences in deceptive behavior. © 2016 Shen, Teo, Winter, Hart, Chew and Ebstein.
dc.publisherFrontiers Media S. A
dc.sourceUnpaywall 20200831
dc.subjectbrain protein
dc.subjectserotonin
dc.subjecttryptophan hydroxylase 2
dc.subjectadult
dc.subjectArticle
dc.subjectdishosnest behavior
dc.subjectexploratory behavior
dc.subjectfemale
dc.subjectgene frequency
dc.subjectgene function
dc.subjectgenetic association
dc.subjectgenetic variability
dc.subjecthaplotype
dc.subjecthuman
dc.subjecthuman experiment
dc.subjectmale
dc.subjectneurotransmission
dc.subjectpersonality
dc.subjectserotonin metabolism
dc.subjectsingle nucleotide polymorphism
dc.subjecttask performance
dc.subjectTPH2 gene
dc.subjectyoung adult
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentDEPT OF ECONOMICS
dc.contributor.departmentDEPT OF PSYCHOLOGY
dc.description.doi10.3389/fnbeh.2016.00082
dc.description.sourcetitleFrontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience
dc.description.volume10
dc.description.issueMAY
dc.description.page82
dc.published.statePublished
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