Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12866-017-0956-z
Title: Microbial survey of ready-to-eat salad ingredients sold at retail reveals the occurrence and the persistence of Listeria monocytogenes Sequence Types 2 and 87 in pre-packed smoked salmon
Authors: Chau, M.L
Aung, K.T
Hapuarachchi, H.C
Lee, P.S.V
Lim, P.Y
Kang, J.S.L
Ng, Y
Yap, H.M
Yuk, H.-G 
Gutiérrez, R.A
Ng, L.C
Keywords: contamination
food safety
human
hygiene
Listeria monocytogenes
nonhuman
pasta
plate count
prevalence
public health
sea food
Singapore
vulnerable population
analysis
animal
Bacillus cereus
bacterial count
bacterium identification
biosynthesis
Campylobacter
classification
enzymology
Escherichia coli
food contamination
food control
food handling
food industry
food packaging
food quality
food safety
genetics
growth, development and aging
isolation and purification
Listeria monocytogenes
listeriosis
microbiology
nucleotide sequence
phylogeny
prevention and control
procedures
salmonine
serotyping
standards
Staphylococcus aureus
vegetable
Vibrio
bacterial DNA
beta lactamase
Animals
Bacillus cereus
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Base Sequence
beta-Lactamases
Campylobacter
Colony Count, Microbial
DNA, Bacterial
Escherichia coli
Food Contamination
Food Handling
Food Industry
Food Microbiology
Food Packaging
Food Quality
Food Safety
Humans
Hygiene
Listeria monocytogenes
Listeriosis
Phylogeny
Prevalence
Public Health
Salmon
Seafood
Serotyping
Singapore
Staphylococcus aureus
Vegetables
Vibrio
Issue Date: 2017
Publisher: BioMed Central Ltd.
Citation: Chau, M.L, Aung, K.T, Hapuarachchi, H.C, Lee, P.S.V, Lim, P.Y, Kang, J.S.L, Ng, Y, Yap, H.M, Yuk, H.-G, Gutiérrez, R.A, Ng, L.C (2017). Microbial survey of ready-to-eat salad ingredients sold at retail reveals the occurrence and the persistence of Listeria monocytogenes Sequence Types 2 and 87 in pre-packed smoked salmon. BMC Microbiology 17 (1) : 46. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12866-017-0956-z
Abstract: Background: As the preparation of salads involves extensive handling and the use of uncooked ingredients, they are particularly vulnerable to microbial contamination. This study aimed to determine the microbial safety and quality of pre-packed salads and salad bar ingredients sold in Singapore, so as to identify public health risks that could arise from consuming salads and to determine areas for improvement in the management of food safety. Results: The most frequently encountered organism in pre-packed salad samples was B. cereus, particularly in pasta salads (33.3%, 10/30). The most commonly detected organism in salad bar ingredients was L. monocytogenes, in particular seafood ingredients (44.1%, 15/34), largely due to contaminated smoked salmon. Further investigation showed that 21.6% (37/171) of the pre-packed smoked salmon sold in supermarkets contained L. monocytogenes. Significantly higher prevalence of L. monocytogenes and higher Standard Plate Count were detected in smoked salmon at salad bars compared to pre-packed smoked salmon in supermarkets, which suggested multiplication of the organism as the products move down the supply chain. Further molecular analysis revealed that L. monocytogenes Sequence Type (ST) 2 and ST87 were present in a particular brand of pre-packed salmon products over a 4-year period, implying a potential persistent contamination problem at the manufacturing level. Conclusions: Our findings highlighted a need to improve manufacturing and retail hygiene processes as well as to educate vulnerable populations to avoid consuming food prone to L. monocytogenes contamination. © 2017 The Author(s).
Source Title: BMC Microbiology
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/173859
ISSN: 14712180
DOI: 10.1186/s12866-017-0956-z
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