Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2020.06.016
Title: The Feasibility and Acceptability of a Cognitive Behavioral Therapy-Based Intervention for Patients With Advanced Colorectal Cancer
Other Titles: EPIC
Authors: TEO ENG AI IRENE 
Yee Pin Tan
Eric Andrew Finkelstein 
YANG MEIJUAN, GRACE 
PAN FANG TING 
Henry Yuen Foong Lew
TAN KWONG WEI EMILE JOHN 
Ong Yew Kuang,Simon 
CHEUNG YIN BUN 
Keywords: Cognitive behavioral therapy
advanced cancer
feasibility
psycho-oncology
psychological distress
self-efficacy
Issue Date: 31-Aug-2020
Publisher: Elsevier
Citation: TEO ENG AI IRENE, Yee Pin Tan, Eric Andrew Finkelstein, YANG MEIJUAN, GRACE, PAN FANG TING, Henry Yuen Foong Lew, TAN KWONG WEI EMILE JOHN, Ong Yew Kuang,Simon, CHEUNG YIN BUN (2020-08-31). The Feasibility and Acceptability of a Cognitive Behavioral Therapy-Based Intervention for Patients With Advanced Colorectal Cancer. Journal of Pain and Symptom Management. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2020.06.016
Abstract: Context: Advanced colorectal cancer and its treatment can bring about challenges associated with psychological distress. Objectives: The primary aims of this study were to examine the feasibility and acceptability of a cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT)-based intervention to improve coping with the disease. The secondary aim is to evaluate preliminary intervention efficacy. Methods: Patients with advanced colorectal cancer in Singapore (N = 60) were randomized to either receive a four-session CBT intervention immediately or be waitlisted. Intervention feasibility (i.e., recruitment and intervention adherence) and acceptability (i.e., participant satisfaction and cultural sensitivity) were assessed. Changes in psychological distress and self-efficacy were examined. Results: The study successfully recruited the intended sample (mean age 61; 62% men). A proportion (12%) reported Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores indicative of distress at baseline. Most (88%) completed all sessions. Participants reported high rates of satisfaction (97%), helpfulness (96%), and cultural sensitivity (95%) of the intervention. The intervention group did not show decrease in psychological distress; however, self-efficacy in cancer-related coping (information seeking: effect size [ES] = 0.64; 95% CI = 0.17, 0.85; coping with side effects: ES = 0.69; 95% CI = 0.33, 0.82; and maintaining positive attitude: ES = 0.45; 95% CI = 0.19, 0.79) increased in the intervention group compared with the waitlisted group. Conclusion: The CBT-based intervention was feasible and acceptable to patients in Singapore. There is no sufficient evidence to warrant a larger trial in this sample with low baseline distress. Future work should identify and target those who are most in need of support.
Source Title: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/173652
ISBN: 08853924
DOI: 10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2020.06.016
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications
Elements

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormatAccess SettingsVersion 
JPSM-D-20-00205_R1.pdf2.75 MBAdobe PDF

OPEN

Pre-printView/Download

Page view(s)

29
checked on Nov 20, 2020

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.