Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1111/ceo.12974
Title: Singapore Indian Eye Study-2: methodology and impact of migration on systemic and eye outcomes
Authors: Sabanayagam, Charumathi 
Yip, Wanfen
Gupta, Preeti
Abdul, Riswana BB Mohd
Lamoureux, Ecosse 
Kumari, Neelam
Cheung, Gemmy CM
Cheung, Carol Y
Wang, Jie Jin 
Cheng, Ching-Yu 
Wong, Tien Yin 
Keywords: Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Ophthalmology
Asian Indians
association
diabetic retinopathy
incidence
progression
POPULATION-BASED ASSESSMENT
URBAN-RURAL EPIDEMIOLOGY
OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP-APNEA
DIABETIC-RETINOPATHY
VISUAL IMPAIRMENT
RISK-FACTORS
SOUTHERN INDIA
UNITED-STATES
PREVALENCE
DISEASE
Issue Date: 1-Nov-2017
Publisher: WILEY
Citation: Sabanayagam, Charumathi, Yip, Wanfen, Gupta, Preeti, Abdul, Riswana BB Mohd, Lamoureux, Ecosse, Kumari, Neelam, Cheung, Gemmy CM, Cheung, Carol Y, Wang, Jie Jin, Cheng, Ching-Yu, Wong, Tien Yin (2017-11-01). Singapore Indian Eye Study-2: methodology and impact of migration on systemic and eye outcomes. CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL OPHTHALMOLOGY 45 (8) : 779-789. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1111/ceo.12974
Abstract: © 2017 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists Importance: Asian Indians are the fastest growing migration groups in the world. Studies evaluating the impact of migration on disease outcomes in this population are rare. Background: We describe the methodology of the Singapore Indian Eye Study-2 (SINDI-2) aimed to evaluate the impact of migration status on diabetic retinopathy and other major age-related eye diseases in Asian Indians living in an urban environment. Design: Population-based cohort study. Participants: A total of 2200 adults had participated in baseline SINDI (2007–2009, mean age [range] = 57.8 [42.7–84.1] years) and SINDI-2 (2013–2015, 56.5 [48.4–90.2] years). Methods: Participants were classified as ‘first generation’ if they were Indian residents born outside of Singapore and as ‘second-generation’ immigrants (59.7% in SINDI vs. 63.6% in SINDI-2) if they were born in Singapore. Main Outcome Measures: Response rate, participant characteristics and prevalence of systemic diseases were stratified by migration status. Results: Of the 2914 eligible SINDI participants invited to participate, 2200 participated in SINDI-2 (response rate of 75.2%). In both SINDI and SINDI-2, compared with first-generation immigrants, second-generation immigrants were younger, less likely to have income <1000 SGD, had lower levels of pulse pressure, higher levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, had lower prevalence of hypertension and chronic kidney disease and had higher prevalence of current smoking and obesity (all P < 0.05). Conclusions and Relevance: In both SINDI and SINDI-2, second-generation immigrants had lower prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors except smoking and obesity compared with first-generation immigrants. The final report will confirm if these differences between generations are evident with regard to eye diseases.
Source Title: CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL OPHTHALMOLOGY
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/173198
ISSN: 14426404
14429071
DOI: 10.1111/ceo.12974
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