Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/170422
Title: A CASE-STUDY ON THE TRANSFERABILITY OF THE RINGI SYSTEM TO SINGAPORE
Authors: TAN LIP CHUAN
Issue Date: 1994
Citation: TAN LIP CHUAN (1994). A CASE-STUDY ON THE TRANSFERABILITY OF THE RINGI SYSTEM TO SINGAPORE. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: In the era of and protectionism, businesses have been intensifying their efforts in circumventing trade barriers through direct foreign investment. The Japanese globalization has stirred up interests in the transferability of Japanese-style management. In view of Japan's post-war economic success, lessor developed nations are also trying to the transfer of Japan's management systems for greater economic growth. One of the core components of Japanese management is the consensus decision-making process, ringi. The ringi system is reputed for letting the lower echelons of an organization propose solutions to work problems, and for the refinement of proposals through discussions among affected parties. In the process, resistance is reduced, executives are trained, and more time is created for managers. Singapore is a culturally fluid society that is able to adopt the ringi system. However, to ensure managerial success, it is necessary to probe into the transferability and applicability of the ringi system in Singapore. There are many factors that can affect the success of the ringi system in Singapore, and managers can change some of these fundamental elements to gain greater success in its adoption. It would be useful for managers to understand the issues involved when they intend to adopt the ringi systen, in Singapore, and eventually maintain its efficient use. Some of the pertinent issues are the method of introduction, the necessary modifications to suit the local culture, and the supporting internal corporate structures required to facilitate active participation among local employees. The fundamental principles in successful transference of the ringi system lie in cultural sensitivity of both Japanese and local staffs, and to fuse the managerial culture into the local culture.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/170422
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses

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