Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/170413
Title: PERSONNEL POLICIES FOR WOMEN IN SINGAPORE
Authors: JASMINE POW CHEU LEE
Issue Date: 1994
Citation: JASMINE POW CHEU LEE (1994). PERSONNEL POLICIES FOR WOMEN IN SINGAPORE. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: With the tight labour force and lesser dependence on foreign labour in Singapore, grcatcr emphasis has to be put on increasing the utilisation of the female population. Although the concerted efforts by the tripartite body is necessary in increasing the female labour force participation rate, employers should develop their own equal opportunities guidelines and policies, which will provide women with a suitable job and to ensure that they are retained in it. Past studies have discussed much on the changing roles of Singapore women. However, no empirical research has been done on the employers' efforts in attracting and retaining more women through equal opportunities in their personnel policies. Hence, this prompted the present study. The main objectives of this study were : 1) To re-emphasise the importance of utilising the female population. 2) To investigate on how the employers in Singapore have set out their personnel policies for the female employees, in response to the need to increase the female labour force participation rate. 3) To suggest ways in which employers can improve their policies to attract and retain more female employees. A survey was conducted on 100 Singapore-based organisations, with 50 private companies and the rest belonging to the public sector. A questionnaire was designed and it consisted of twenty-eight questions which covered the following areas : recruitment and selection, promotion, career development, training and retraining, the remuneration system, fringe benefits, alternative work arrangements, and child care arrangements. A frequency distribution was used to report the number of responses that each question received. Results from the returned questionnaires revealed that sexual discrimination against women in recruitment and selection, career development, training and compensation, still exist in many organisations in Singapore. In order to attract and retain more women in the work place, flexible work arrangements such as flexitime, part-time employment, telecommuting,job sharing, shift work and 5-day work week, may be useful in accomplishing this goal. In addition, as child care remained the main reason for the exit of mothers from the labour force, child care arrangements such as on-site or near-site child care centres, financial assistance, and information and referral services, may be provided by employers to help working mothers cope with work and family demands so that they will be retained in the labour force. As a result of the findings and discussions that were uncovered, recommendations were also being made in this study.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/170413
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses

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