Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0196328
Title: Epicardial and visceral adipose tissue in relation to subclinical atherosclerosis in a Chinese population
Authors: Khaing N.E.E. 
Shyong T.E. 
Lee J. 
Soekojo C.Y.
Ng A.
Van Dam R.M. 
Keywords: cholesterol
glucose
hemoglobin A1c
high density lipoprotein cholesterol
lipid
low density lipoprotein cholesterol
triacylglycerol
calcium
abdominal fat
adult
age
Article
atherosclerosis
body fat
cardiovascular disease
Chinese
computer assisted tomography
coronary artery calcification
coronary artery calcium score
correlation analysis
cross-sectional study
diastolic blood pressure
diet restriction
disease association
dyslipidemia
epicardial fat
fat mass
female
gender
glucose blood level
human
hyperglycemia
interview
intra-abdominal fat
lipid storage
major clinical study
male
middle aged
obesity
risk factor
Singapore
subcutaneous fat
systolic blood pressure
abdominal subcutaneous fat
aged
Asian continental ancestry group
atherosclerosis
coronary blood vessel
diagnostic imaging
intra-abdominal fat
metabolism
odds ratio
pathology
pericardium
physiology
x-ray computed tomography
Aged
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Atherosclerosis
Calcium
Coronary Vessels
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Intra-Abdominal Fat
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Pericardium
Risk Factors
Singapore
Subcutaneous Fat, Abdominal
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Issue Date: 2018
Publisher: Public Library of Science
Citation: Khaing N.E.E., Shyong T.E., Lee J., Soekojo C.Y., Ng A., Van Dam R.M. (2018). Epicardial and visceral adipose tissue in relation to subclinical atherosclerosis in a Chinese population. PLoS ONE 13 (4) : e0196328. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0196328
Abstract: Background Body fatness is associated with risk of coronary heart disease and it has been postulated that epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) may have a particularly detrimental effect because of its localized toxic effects. We therefore aimed to examine the association between EAT and coronary artery calcification and compared this with associations for visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and other regional fat depots. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study of 487 Chinese participants aged 50 years old and above, living in Singapore. Participants, free from known diabetes mellitus and coronary heart diseases, completed interviews, a health screening to evaluate obesity and cardiovascular disease risk factors, and computed tomography scans of the abdomen and coronary arteries. Associations between regional fat depots and subclinical atherosclerosis defined as CAC> = 100 were determined by multiple logistic regression analysis. Results Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) was highly correlated with visceral adipose tissue (VAT) (Pearson r = 0.72) and trunk fat mass (r = 0.66). The age and sex-adjusted odd ratio (OR) (in 1-SD increase) of subclinical atherosclerosis was 1.28 (1.01–1.61) for EAT and 1.40 (1.04–1.88) for VAT. These associations were weaker and non-significant after adjusting for markers of dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia. Total body fat, subcutaneous abdominal fat, and leg, arm and trunk fat mass were not significantly associated with atherosclerosis. Conclusion VAT and EAT showed similar associations with coronary artery calcification and the associations could be mediated by traditional risk factors in this ethnic Chinese population. © This is an open access article, free of all copyright, and may be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, modified, built upon, or otherwise used by anyone for any lawful purpose. The work is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication.
Source Title: PLoS ONE
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/165902
ISSN: 19326203
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0196328
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