Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0154595
Title: The effect of availability of manpower on trauma resuscitation times in a Tertiary Academic Hospital
Authors: Tan T.X.Z.
Quek N.X.E.
Koh Z.X.
Nadkarni N. 
Singaram K.
Ho A.F.W.
Ong M.E.H. 
Wong T.H. 
Keywords: adolescent
adult
aged
Article
assault
blunt trauma
falling
female
health care concepts
health care manpower
human
injury scale
length of stay
major clinical study
male
observational study
occupational accident
resuscitation
resuscitation area occupancy rate
Singapore
tertiary care center
traffic accident
trauma size team
university hospital
hospital emergency service
manpower
middle aged
patient care
resuscitation
statistics and numerical data
tertiary care center
time factor
Wounds and Injuries
young adult
Adult
Emergency Service, Hospital
Female
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Care Team
Resuscitation
Tertiary Care Centers
Time Factors
Wounds and Injuries
Young Adult
Issue Date: 2016
Publisher: Public Library of Science
Citation: Tan T.X.Z., Quek N.X.E., Koh Z.X., Nadkarni N., Singaram K., Ho A.F.W., Ong M.E.H., Wong T.H. (2016). The effect of availability of manpower on trauma resuscitation times in a Tertiary Academic Hospital. PLoS ONE 11 (5) : e0154595. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0154595
Abstract: Background: For trauma patients, delays to assessment, resuscitation, and definitive care affect outcomes. We studied the effects of resuscitation area occupancy and trauma team size on trauma team resuscitation speed in an observational study at a tertiary academic institution in Singapore. Methods: From January 2014 to January 2015, resuscitation videos of trauma team activated patients with an Injury Severity Score of 9 or more were extracted for review within 14 days by independent reviewers. Exclusion criteria were patients dead on arrival, inter-hospital transfers, and up-triaged patients. Data captured included manpower availability (trauma team size and resuscitation area occupancy), assessment (airway, breathing, circulation, logroll), interventions (vascular access, imaging), and process-of-care time intervals (time to assessment/intervention/adjuncts, time to imaging, and total time in the emergency department). Clinical data were obtained by chart review and from the trauma registry. Results: Videos of 70 patients were reviewed over a 13-month period. The median time spent in the emergency department was 154.9 minutes (IQR 130.7-207.5) and the median resuscitation team size was 7, with larger team sizes correlating with faster process-of-care time intervals: time to airway assessment (p = 0.08) and time to disposition (p = 0.04). The mean resuscitation area occupancy rate (RAOR) was 1.89±2.49, and the RAOR was positively correlated with time spent in the emergency department (p = 0.009). Conclusion: Our results suggest that adequate staffing for trauma teams and resuscitation room occupancy are correlated with faster trauma resuscitation and reduced time spent in the emergency department. © 2016 Tan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Source Title: PLoS ONE
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/165749
ISSN: 19326203
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0154595
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