Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1000222
Title: Migratory dermal dendritic cells act as rapid sensors of protozoan parasites
Authors: Lai G.N. 
Hsu A.
Mandell M.A.
Roediger B.
Hoeller C.
Mrass P.
Iparraguirre A.
Cavanagh L.L.
Triccas J.A.
Beverley S.M.
Scott P.
Weninger W.
Keywords: guanine nucleotide binding protein alpha subunit
diagnostic agent
guanine nucleotide binding protein alpha subunit
photoprotein
unclassified drug
yellow fluorescent protein, mouse
animal cell
article
cell function
cell migration
cell motility
cell subpopulation
cell vacuole
controlled study
cytosol
dendritic cell
immunosurveillance
innate immunity
interstitium
Leishmania major
microenvironment
microorganism detection
microscopy
mouse
neutrophil
nonhuman
phagocytosis
protozoal infection
pseudogout
rat
animal
cell motion
cytology
immunology
Leishmania major
parasitology
protozoon
pseudopodium
skin
Leishmania major
Protozoa
Pseudopoda
Animals
Cell Movement
Dendritic Cells
GTP-Binding Protein alpha Subunits
Immunity, Innate
Leishmania major
Luminescent Proteins
Mice
Microscopy
Phagocytosis
Protozoa
Pseudopodia
Skin
Issue Date: 2008
Publisher: Public Library of Science
Citation: Lai G.N., Hsu A., Mandell M.A., Roediger B., Hoeller C., Mrass P., Iparraguirre A., Cavanagh L.L., Triccas J.A., Beverley S.M., Scott P., Weninger W. (2008). Migratory dermal dendritic cells act as rapid sensors of protozoan parasites. PLoS Pathogens 4 (11) : e1000222. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1000222
Abstract: Dendritic cells (DC), including those of the skin, act as sentinels for intruding microorganisms. In the epidermis, DC (termed Langerhans cells, LC) are sessile and screen their microenvironment through occasional movements of their dendrites. The spatio-temporal orchestration of antigen encounter by dermal DC (DDC) is not known. Since these cells are thought to be instrumental in the initiation of immune responses during infection, we investigated their behavior directly within their natural microenvironment using intravital two-photon microscopy. Surprisingly, we found that, under homeostatic conditions, DDC were highly motile, continuously crawling through the interstitial space in a G?i protein-coupled receptor-dependent manner. However, within minutes after intradermal delivery of the protozoan parasite Leishmania major, DDC became immobile and incorporated multiple parasites into cytosolic vacuoles. Parasite uptake occurred through the extension of long, highly dynamic pseudopods capable of tracking and engulfing parasites. This was then followed by rapid dendrite retraction towards the cell body. DDC were proficient at discriminating between parasites and inert particles, and parasite uptake was independent of the presence of neutrophils. Together, our study has visualized the dynamics and microenvironmental context of parasite encounter by an innate immune cell subset during the initiation of the immune response. Our results uncover a unique migratory tissue surveillance program of DDC that ensures the rapid detection of pathogens. © 2008 Ng et al.
Source Title: PLoS Pathogens
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/165422
ISSN: 15537366
DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1000222
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