Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/163184
Title: TEAR LIPID MEDIATORS IN HEALTHY PEOPLE AND THOSE WITH OCULAR SURFACE DISEASE
Authors: YOHANNES ABERE AMBAW
Keywords: Lipid mediators, Tears, Ocular surface, Mass spectrometry, MGD and Lipidomics
Issue Date: 5-Aug-2019
Citation: YOHANNES ABERE AMBAW (2019-08-05). TEAR LIPID MEDIATORS IN HEALTHY PEOPLE AND THOSE WITH OCULAR SURFACE DISEASE. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Dry eye syndrome (DES) is associated with instability of tears and inflammation of the ocular surface. Inflammation is in part mediated by the regulation of lipid mediators that exist on the ocular surface and/or are released into tears. Lipid mediators derived from polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are involved in the modulation of inflammatory responses due to both pro- and/or anti-inflammatory properties. However, the role of tear lipid mediators in DES patients has not been well characterized comprehensively. Therefore, I optimized a quantitative method for analysis of lipid mediators in human tears, based largely on the principles of liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. The optimized lipidomic approaches were subsequently applied onto healthy aging, clinical case/control and longitudinal interventional studies, to understand the pathogenesis of DES. Simultaneous quantification of 38 lipid mediators in tears was achieved and levels were shown to be increased in age-dependent manner. Specific mediators were associated with clinical signs and could serve as indicators of obstruction of the meibomian gland. Overall, our work has emphasized the importance of lipid mediators in the pathogenesis of ocular surface inflammation, especially on dry eye disease.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/163184
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