Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0122180
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dc.titleMales and females gain differentially from sociality in a promiscuous fruit bat Cynopterus sphinx
dc.contributor.authorGarg K.M.
dc.contributor.authorChattopadhyay B.
dc.contributor.authorSwami Doss D.P.
dc.contributor.authorVinoth Kumar A.K.
dc.contributor.authorKandula S.
dc.contributor.authorRamakrishnan U.
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-07T05:00:40Z
dc.date.available2019-11-07T05:00:40Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationGarg K.M., Chattopadhyay B., Swami Doss D.P., Vinoth Kumar A.K., Kandula S., Ramakrishnan U. (2015). Males and females gain differentially from sociality in a promiscuous fruit bat Cynopterus sphinx. PLoS ONE 10 (3) : e0122180. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0122180
dc.identifier.issn19326203
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/161739
dc.description.abstractSociality emerges when the benefits of group living outweigh its costs. While both males and females are capable of strong social ties, the evolutionary drivers for sociality and the benefits accrued maybe different for each sex. In this study, we investigate the differential reproductive success benefits of group membership that males and females might obtain in the promiscuous fruit bat Cynopterus sphinx. Individuals of this species live in flexible social groups called colonies. These colonies are labile and there is high turnover of individuals. However, colony males sire more offspring within the colony suggesting that being part of a colony may result in reproductive benefits for males. This also raises the possibility that long-term loyalty towards the colony may confer additional advantage in terms of higher reproductive success. We used ten seasons of genetic parentage data to estimate reproductive success and relatedness of individuals in the colony. We used recapture data to identify long and short-term residents in the colony as well as to obtain rates of recapture for males and females. Our results reveal that males have a significantly higher chance of becoming long-term residents (than females), and these long-term resident males gain twice the reproductive success compared to short-term resident males. We also observed that long-term resident females are related to each other and also achieve higher reproductive success than short-term resident females. In contrast, long-term resident males do not differ from short-term resident males in their levels of relatedness. Our results re-iterate the benefits of sociality even in species that are promiscuous and socially labile and possible benefits of maintaining a colony. © 2015 Garg et al.
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceUnpaywall 20191101
dc.subjectadaptive behavior
dc.subjectanimal behavior
dc.subjectanimal society
dc.subjectArticle
dc.subjectbat
dc.subjectcontrolled study
dc.subjectCynopterus sphinx
dc.subjectfemale
dc.subjectmale
dc.subjectnonhuman
dc.subjectorganism colony
dc.subjectreproductive success
dc.subjectseasonal variation
dc.subjectsex difference
dc.subjectsocial behavior
dc.subjectsociality
dc.subjectanimal
dc.subjectbat
dc.subjectphysiology
dc.subjectreproduction
dc.subjectseason
dc.subjectsexual behavior
dc.subjectCynopterus sphinx
dc.subjectAnimals
dc.subjectChiroptera
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectReproduction
dc.subjectSeasons
dc.subjectSexual Behavior, Animal
dc.subjectSocial Behavior
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentDEPT OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
dc.description.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0122180
dc.description.sourcetitlePLoS ONE
dc.description.volume10
dc.description.issue3
dc.description.pagee0122180
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