Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0122180
Title: Males and females gain differentially from sociality in a promiscuous fruit bat Cynopterus sphinx
Authors: Garg K.M. 
Chattopadhyay B. 
Swami Doss D.P.
Vinoth Kumar A.K.
Kandula S.
Ramakrishnan U.
Keywords: adaptive behavior
animal behavior
animal society
Article
bat
controlled study
Cynopterus sphinx
female
male
nonhuman
organism colony
reproductive success
seasonal variation
sex difference
social behavior
sociality
animal
bat
physiology
reproduction
season
sexual behavior
Cynopterus sphinx
Animals
Chiroptera
Female
Male
Reproduction
Seasons
Sexual Behavior, Animal
Social Behavior
Issue Date: 2015
Citation: Garg K.M., Chattopadhyay B., Swami Doss D.P., Vinoth Kumar A.K., Kandula S., Ramakrishnan U. (2015). Males and females gain differentially from sociality in a promiscuous fruit bat Cynopterus sphinx. PLoS ONE 10 (3) : e0122180. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0122180
Abstract: Sociality emerges when the benefits of group living outweigh its costs. While both males and females are capable of strong social ties, the evolutionary drivers for sociality and the benefits accrued maybe different for each sex. In this study, we investigate the differential reproductive success benefits of group membership that males and females might obtain in the promiscuous fruit bat Cynopterus sphinx. Individuals of this species live in flexible social groups called colonies. These colonies are labile and there is high turnover of individuals. However, colony males sire more offspring within the colony suggesting that being part of a colony may result in reproductive benefits for males. This also raises the possibility that long-term loyalty towards the colony may confer additional advantage in terms of higher reproductive success. We used ten seasons of genetic parentage data to estimate reproductive success and relatedness of individuals in the colony. We used recapture data to identify long and short-term residents in the colony as well as to obtain rates of recapture for males and females. Our results reveal that males have a significantly higher chance of becoming long-term residents (than females), and these long-term resident males gain twice the reproductive success compared to short-term resident males. We also observed that long-term resident females are related to each other and also achieve higher reproductive success than short-term resident females. In contrast, long-term resident males do not differ from short-term resident males in their levels of relatedness. Our results re-iterate the benefits of sociality even in species that are promiscuous and socially labile and possible benefits of maintaining a colony. © 2015 Garg et al.
Source Title: PLoS ONE
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/161739
ISSN: 19326203
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0122180
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