Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1001193
Title: CO2 acts as a signalling molecule in populations of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans
Authors: Hall R.A.
de Sordi L.
MacCallum D.M.
Topal H.
Eaton R.
Bloor J.W.
Robinson G.K.
Levin L.R.
Buck J.
Wang Y. 
Gow N.A.R.
Steegborn C.
Mühlschlegel F.A.
Keywords: adenylate cyclase
bicarbonate
carbon dioxide
lysine
peptidoglycan
adenylate cyclase
messenger RNA
peptidoglycan
animal experiment
animal model
article
binding site
Candida albicans
controlled study
Drosophila melanogaster
female
fungal biomass
fungal colonization
fungal virulence
fungus growth
invasive candidiasis
mouse
nonhuman
nucleotide sequence
signal transduction
animal
Bagg albino mouse
biomass
candidiasis
cell communication
comparative study
disease model
genetics
metabolism
microbiology
pathogenicity
physiology
reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction
Saccharomyces cerevisiae
site directed mutagenesis
Southern blotting
survival rate
Western blotting
Bacteria (microorganisms)
Candida
Candida albicans
Drosophila melanogaster
Adenylate Cyclase
Animals
Bicarbonates
Biomass
Blotting, Southern
Blotting, Western
Candida albicans
Candidiasis
Carbon Dioxide
Cell Communication
Disease Models, Animal
Drosophila melanogaster
Female
Mice
Mice, Inbred BALB C
Mutagenesis, Site-Directed
Peptidoglycan
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
RNA, Messenger
Saccharomyces cerevisiae
Signal Transduction
Survival Rate
Issue Date: 2010
Citation: Hall R.A., de Sordi L., MacCallum D.M., Topal H., Eaton R., Bloor J.W., Robinson G.K., Levin L.R., Buck J., Wang Y., Gow N.A.R., Steegborn C., Mühlschlegel F.A. (2010). CO2 acts as a signalling molecule in populations of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans. PLoS Pathogens 6 (11) : e1001193. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1001193
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
Abstract: When colonising host-niches or non-animated medical devices, individual cells of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans expand into significant biomasses. Here we show that within such biomasses, fungal metabolically generated CO2 acts as a communication molecule promoting the switch from yeast to filamentous growth essential for C. albicans pathology. We find that CO2-mediated intra-colony signalling involves the adenylyl cyclase protein (Cyr1p), a multi-sensor recently found to coordinate fungal responses to serum and bacterial peptidoglycan. We further identify Lys 1373 as essential for CO2/bicarbonate regulation of Cyr1p. Disruption of the CO2/bicarbonate receptor-site interferes selectively with C. albicans filamentation within fungal biomasses. Comparisons between the Drosophila melanogaster infection model and the mouse model of disseminated candidiasis, suggest that metabolic CO2 sensing may be important for initial colonisation and epithelial invasion. Our results reveal the existence of a gaseous Candida signalling pathway and its molecular mechanism and provide insights into an evolutionary conserved CO2-signalling system. © 2010 Hall et al.
Source Title: PLoS Pathogens
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/161657
ISSN: 15537366
DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1001193
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
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