Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0162102
Title: Age-related changes in the cardiometabolic profiles in Singapore resident adult population: Findings from the national health survey 2010
Authors: Loh T.P. 
Ma S. 
Heng D. 
Khoo C.M. 
Keywords: creatinine
hemoglobin A1c
low density lipoprotein cholesterol
cholesterol
glucose blood level
lipid
low density lipoprotein cholesterol
adult
age distribution
aging
Article
cardiovascular disease
controlled study
diabetes mellitus
diastolic blood pressure
dyslipidemia
female
glomerulus filtration rate
health care planning
health survey
hemoglobin blood level
human
hypertension
kidney function
major clinical study
male
national health service
oral glucose tolerance test
population research
pulse pressure
risk assessment
risk factor
sex difference
Singapore
systolic blood pressure
age
blood
blood pressure
Cardiovascular Diseases
glucose blood level
health survey
metabolism
middle aged
physiology
statistics and numerical data
Adult
Age Factors
Blood Glucose
Blood Pressure
Cardiovascular Diseases
Cholesterol
Cholesterol, LDL
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Hypertension
Lipids
Male
Middle Aged
Singapore
Issue Date: 2016
Citation: Loh T.P., Ma S., Heng D., Khoo C.M. (2016). Age-related changes in the cardiometabolic profiles in Singapore resident adult population: Findings from the national health survey 2010. PLoS ONE 11 (8) : e0162102. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0162102
Abstract: We describe the centile trends of the blood pressure, glycemia and lipid profiles as well as renal function of a representative population who participated in the Singapore National Health Survey in 2010. Representative survey population was sampled in two phases, first using geographical/residential dwelling type stratification, followed up ethnicity. 2, 407 survey participants without any self-reported medical or medication history for diabetes mellitus, hypertension and dyslipidemia were included in this analysis. All biochemistry analyses were performed on Roche platforms. After excluding outliers using Tukey's criteria, the results of the remaining participants were subjected to lambda-mu-sigma (LMS) analysis. In men, systolic blood pressure increased linearly with age. By contrast, an upward inflection around late 40s was seen in women. The diastolic blood pressure was highest in men in the late 30s-50s age group, and in women in the late 50s-60s age group. All glycemia-related parameters, i.e. fasting and 2-hour plasma glucose and HbA1c concentrations increased with age, although the rate of increase differed between the tests. Total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol concentrations increased with age, which became attenuated between the early 30s and late 50s in men, and declined thereafter. In women, total cholesterol and LDLcholesterol concentrations gradually increased with age until late 30s, when there is an upward inflection, plateauing after late 50s. Our findings indicate that diagnostic performance of laboratory tests for diabetes may be age-sensitive. Unfavourable age-related cardiovascular risk profiles suggest that the burden of cardiovascular disease in this population will increase with aging population. © 2016 Loh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Source Title: PLoS ONE
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/161558
ISSN: 19326203
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0162102
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