Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0068319
Title: Higher Gravidity and Parity Are Associated with Increased Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome among Rural Bangladeshi Women
Authors: Akter S.
Jesmin S.
Rahman M.M. 
Islam M.M.
Khatun M.T.
Yamaguchi N.
Akashi H.
Mizutani T.
Keywords: adolescent
adult
aged
article
Bangladeshi
controlled study
cross-sectional study
disease association
ethnic group
female
human
hypertension
lifestyle
major clinical study
metabolic syndrome X
multipara
pregnant woman
premenopause
reproductive health
risk assessment
risk factor
rural population
social status
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Bangladesh
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Gravidity
Humans
Metabolic Syndrome X
Middle Aged
Parity
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Risk Factors
Rural Population
Young Adult
Issue Date: 2013
Citation: Akter S., Jesmin S., Rahman M.M., Islam M.M., Khatun M.T., Yamaguchi N., Akashi H., Mizutani T. (2013). Higher Gravidity and Parity Are Associated with Increased Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome among Rural Bangladeshi Women. PLoS ONE 8 (8) : e68319. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0068319
Abstract: Background:Parity increases the risk for coronary heart disease; however, its association with metabolic syndrome among women in low-income countries is still unknown.Objective:This study investigates the association between parity or gravidity and metabolic syndrome in rural Bangladeshi women.Methods:A cross-sectional study was conducted in 1,219 women aged 15-75 years from rural Bangladesh. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the standard NCEP-ATP III criteria. Logistic regression was used to estimate the association between parity and gravidity and metabolic syndrome, with adjustment of potential confounding variables.Results:Subjects with the highest gravidity (> = 4) had 1.66 times higher odds of having metabolic syndrome compared to those in the lowest gravidity (0-1) (P trend = 0.02). A similar association was found between parity and metabolic syndrome (P trend = 0.04), i.e., subjects in the highest parity (> = 4) had 1.65 times higher odds of having metabolic syndrome compared to those in the lowest parity (0-1). This positive association of parity and gravidity with metabolic syndrome was confined to pre-menopausal women (P trend <0.01). Among the components of metabolic syndrome only high blood pressure showed positive association with parity and gravidity (P trend = 0.01 and <0.001). Neither Parity nor gravidity was appreciably associated with other components of metabolic syndrome.Conclusions:Multi parity or gravidity may be a risk factor for metabolic syndrome. © 2013 Akter et al.
Source Title: PLoS ONE
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/161282
ISSN: 19326203
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0068319
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