Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/159498
Title: SECURITY GOOD – NOBODY DISTURB’: EMBODIMENTS OF SECURITY THROUGH THE LIVES OF BANGLADESHI MIGRANT WORKERS IN SINGAPORE
Authors: TAN LI XIAN DANIEL
Keywords: Bangladeshi migrant workers
Securitization
Purpose?Built Dormitory
Recreation Centers
Governmentality
Biopower
Embodied
Singapore
Issue Date: 2019
Citation: TAN LI XIAN DANIEL (2019). SECURITY GOOD – NOBODY DISTURB’: EMBODIMENTS OF SECURITY THROUGH THE LIVES OF BANGLADESHI MIGRANT WORKERS IN SINGAPORE. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Literature on low?wage transient migrants in Singapore and their encounter with state securitization has largely focused on the public (e.g. discourse, spaces). Less attention is paid on empirical research in private spaces, which can offer insights into daily aspects of the migration?security nexus (i.e. migrant’s encounter with security). This thesis aims to rectify this gap by deploying walking interviews with Bangladeshi migrant workers living in dormitories along Jalan Terusan to gather insights on migrant’s experiences with securitization. Static interviews were also conducted with key informants from Healthserve, a Non?Governmental Organization (NGO). Migrants encounter a variety of security actors in Purpose?Built Dormitories (PBDs) and Recreation Centers (RCs), including dormitory, auxiliary and state police. Using Foucault’s governmentality, I contend that dormitory and recreational spaces are nexus of power, where discourse and practices of security are inscribed onto migrant bodies. Moreover, as Noxolo has argued, migrants are able to embody the point of articulation between different security nexus. By exploring migrant’s everyday experiences in PBDs and RCs, I attempt to cast their experiences as embodiments of the security regime. This research aims to investigate 1) how power operates through the securitization of transmigrants in PBDs and RCs, and 2) how migrant workers navigate through the migration?security nexus on an everyday basis. In doing so, this thesis questions security narratives embedded within the low?wage transient migration regime in Singapore, with intent to support and propose a more integrated migration.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/159498
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses

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