Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/157716
Title: EFFECTS OF ENGAGING IN WORK-RELATED ACTIVITIES DURING THE COMMUTE ON STRAIN-BASED INTERFERENCES
Authors: CHEONG KAH YIN, SONIA
Keywords: Commuting
Work-related In-Commute Activities
Psychological Detachment
Work-Family Conflict
Issue Date: 4-Dec-2019
Citation: CHEONG KAH YIN, SONIA (2019-12-04). EFFECTS OF ENGAGING IN WORK-RELATED ACTIVITIES DURING THE COMMUTE ON STRAIN-BASED INTERFERENCES. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: The present study investigated the effects of engaging in work-related in-commute activities (ICA) during the morning commute to work and the evening commute back home. The outcomes examined were strain-based family interference with work (FIW) and work interference with family (WIF) for the morning and evening commute respectively. Psychological detachment was also examined as a mediator between work-related ICA and the respective outcomes. Additionally, employees' segmentation preference was also proposed to be a moderating factor. Using the experience sampling method, 142 participants completed the daily surveys over a period of ten workdays. Results showed that for the morning commute, psychological detachment mediated the negative relationship between work-related ICA and strain-based FIW. Similar mediation effects of psychological detachment were found for the positive relationship between work-related ICA and strain-based WIF. Therefore, the findings suggest that work-related ICA is likely to be beneficial for the morning commute, but harmful during the evening commute. Segmentation preference was found to only moderate the indirect relationship between work-related ICA and strain-based WIF. Hence, this suggested that employees with a high segmentation preference were much more likely to experience strain-based WIF when they maintained a low level of psychological detachment during the evening commute.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/157716
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses

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