Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/157710
Title: PARENTAL ATTACHMENT, ACADEMIC BURNOUT AND DISORDERED EATING BEHAVIOUR AMONG SINGAPOREAN UNDERGRADUATES
Authors: WAH HWI MAINE, CHARMAINE RHEA
Keywords: Parental attachment
Academic burnout
Disordered eating behaviour
Undergraduates
Singapore
Adolescent psychology
Issue Date: 4-Dec-2019
Citation: WAH HWI MAINE, CHARMAINE RHEA (2019-12-04). PARENTAL ATTACHMENT, ACADEMIC BURNOUT AND DISORDERED EATING BEHAVIOUR AMONG SINGAPOREAN UNDERGRADUATES. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Disordered eating behaviour has recently been found to be preceded by academic burnout in undergraduates. In addition, studies suggest that parental attachment could also predict disordered eating behaviour and academic burnout. Furthermore, parental involvement in education could lead to a decrease in risk of burnout. Hence, it was hypothesised that there would be a moderated mediation relationship, where parental attachment predicts disordered eating behaviour, partly as a function of academic burnout. Perceived parental involvement in education was the proposed moderator to the relationship between parental attachment and academic burnout. The variables were measured using online questionnaires that were administered to undergraduates studying full-time in Singapore. The results showed that there was no significant moderated mediation, however, when the proposed moderator, parental involvement in education, was excluded, a significant mediation relationship was found. The study also explored gender effects and hypothesised that gender would moderate the relationship between academic burnout and disordered behaviour. However, this hypothesis was not supported. When single parent variables were analysed separately, it was found that father involvement significantly predicted academic burnout. Specifically, higher father involvement predicted an increase in academic burnout scores. The implications and possible explanations behind the findings are also discussed.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/157710
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