Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.26107/RBZ-2019-0002
Title: Evidence of genetic connectivity between fragmented pig populations in a tropical urban city-state
Authors: Koh, Joshua J-M
RHEINDT, FRANK ERWIN 
NG YING XIN, ELIZE 
WEBB,EDWARD LAYMAN 
Keywords: Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Zoology
Fragmentation
gene flow
population genetics
Sus scrofa
urbanisation
BOAR SUS-SCROFA
WILD BOAR
HABITAT FRAGMENTATION
FOREST FRAGMENTATION
MICROSATELLITE ANALYSIS
FERAL PIGS
FLOW
LANDSCAPE
VEGETATION
DIVERSITY
Issue Date: 1-Jan-2019
Publisher: NATL UNIV SINGAPORE, SCHOOL BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
Citation: Koh, Joshua J-M, RHEINDT, FRANK ERWIN, NG YING XIN, ELIZE, WEBB,EDWARD LAYMAN (2019-01-01). Evidence of genetic connectivity between fragmented pig populations in a tropical urban city-state. Raffles Bulletin of Zoology 67 : 14-31. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.26107/RBZ-2019-0002
Abstract: © National University of Singapore. Forest fragmentation as a result of urbanisation can adversely affect gene flow between wildlife populations. Although gene flow among fragmented populations has been investigated for many species, there has been little research into the effects of urbanisation on gene flow in large mammals. Singapore is a small, densely urbanised tropical city-state where more than 99% of its original forest has been cleared. The wild pig is currently the largest native terrestrial mammal in Singapore and has important roles in maintaining plant diversity and seed dispersal. Pigs are widespread and present in the Central Catchment Nature Reserve (CCNR) as well as other forest patches in Singapore. Due to the extent of urbanisation, it is unclear if genetic connectivity exists between the CCNR and other forest fragments. In this study, genome libraries from 48 samples of pig blood were collected from two sites: 1) the CCNR and 2) forest fragments in the northeast of Singapore. Genome-wide SNP loci were used to understand the population genomics of the two pig populations. The results indicated that the pig populations formed two distinct genetic clusters that did not align with the respective sites. Both sites included individuals with signatures from both genetic clusters, although with different frequencies. This suggests that pigs can move across heavily urbanised landscapes. Future studies should involve long term collaring studies to identify specific corridors used by the pigs for dispersal, and a larger population genomic assessment to understand pig dispersal and gene flow to and from forest patches other than the CCNR and the Northeast.
Source Title: Raffles Bulletin of Zoology
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/156949
ISSN: 0217-2445
DOI: 10.26107/RBZ-2019-0002
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