Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/155964
Title: AN AFFECTIVE CONVERSATION ABOUT INTERCULTURAL PERFORMANCE: A STUDY OF YANG JUNG-UNG'S ADAPTATIONS OF SHAKESPEARE
Authors: CHAN HSIN YEE
Issue Date: 15-Apr-2019
Citation: CHAN HSIN YEE (2019-04-15). AN AFFECTIVE CONVERSATION ABOUT INTERCULTURAL PERFORMANCE: A STUDY OF YANG JUNG-UNG'S ADAPTATIONS OF SHAKESPEARE. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: This paper intersects between intercultural performance, Shakespeare, digital performance, archival studies, and affect theory to critically discuss Yang Jung-Ung’s adaptions of Shakespeare: Pericles, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Twelfth Night, and Hamlet. This discussion is framed by two questions: what vocabulary can be used to articulate my encounter with Yang’s work, and how could that vocabulary then lead to a deeper understanding of what intercultural performance does. These questions find an answer in affect: the intercultural engagement in performance is primarily experienced as a range of complex bodied perceptions. My affect-centric approach relies heavily on Erika Fischer-Lichte who is a notable figure in performance studies for emphasising the phenomenal dimensions of performance. In Chapter 1, I address the implications of engaging with Yang’s works through their documented forms on the Asian Shakespeare Intercultural Archive (A|S|I|A). My adoption of this method joins a growing body of critics who recognise that in the contemporary media-saturated global context, it is no longer feasible to believe that performance operates “in a cultural economy separate from media technology” (Sant 21). By aligning myself with these critics, I hope to distinguish my argument from Fischer-Lichte’s totalisation of the live performance event. Using affect as a framework reveals the complexities of Yang’s staging strategies and offers precise terms to discuss how intercultural performance creates an awareness of cultural subjectivity. My argument here is in response to current intercultural performance discourse that endeavours to move away from binaristic approaches which embody cultural imperialist notions. To illustrate, I apply an affect-centric approach to critically analyse Yang’s staging strategies of metatheatre (Chapter 2) and rhythm (Chapter 3), to show how a focus on affect elucidates the complexities and malleability of the spectator’s positionality vis-àvis intercultural performance.This paper intersects between intercultural performance, Shakespeare, digital performance, archival studies, and affect theory to critically discuss Yang Jung-Ung’s adaptions of Shakespeare: Pericles, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Twelfth Night, and Hamlet. This discussion is framed by two questions: what vocabulary can be used to articulate my encounter with Yang’s work, and how could that vocabulary then lead to a deeper understanding of what intercultural performance does. These questions find an answer in affect: the intercultural engagement in performance is primarily experienced as a range of complex bodied perceptions. My affect-centric approach relies heavily on Erika Fischer-Lichte who is a notable figure in performance studies for emphasising the phenomenal dimensions of performance. In Chapter 1, I address the implications of engaging with Yang’s works through their documented forms on the Asian Shakespeare Intercultural Archive (A|S|I|A). My adoption of this method joins a growing body of critics who recognise that in the contemporary media-saturated global context, it is no longer feasible to believe that performance operates “in a cultural economy separate from media technology” (Sant 21). By aligning myself with these critics, I hope to distinguish my argument from Fischer-Lichte’s totalisation of the live performance event. Using affect as a framework reveals the complexities of Yang’s staging strategies and offers precise terms to discuss how intercultural performance creates an awareness of cultural subjectivity. My argument here is in response to current intercultural performance discourse that endeavours to move away from binaristic approaches which embody cultural imperialist notions. To illustrate, I apply an affect-centric approach to critically analyse Yang’s staging strategies of metatheatre (Chapter 2) and rhythm (Chapter 3), to show how a focus on affect elucidates the complexities and malleability of the spectator’s positionality vis-àvis intercultural performance.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/155964
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