Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/155605
Title: HERITAGE HOTELS AS NATIONAL MONUMENTS: AN EXAMINATION OF THE CONSERVATION AND PROMOTIONAL NARRATIVES OF COLONIAL HERITAGE HOTELS IN SINGAPORE SINCE THE 1980S
Authors: CHUNG XIAO XUAN GLORIA
Keywords: Colonial Heritage
Colonial Nostalgia
Heritage Conservation
Heritage Tourism
Heritage Hotels
National Monuments
Singapore History
Issue Date: 22-Apr-2019
Citation: CHUNG XIAO XUAN GLORIA (2019-04-22). HERITAGE HOTELS AS NATIONAL MONUMENTS: AN EXAMINATION OF THE CONSERVATION AND PROMOTIONAL NARRATIVES OF COLONIAL HERITAGE HOTELS IN SINGAPORE SINCE THE 1980S. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: This thesis examines how official attitudes towards Singapore’s colonial past are often reflected through the conservation and promotional narratives of colonial-style heritage hotels that have been entirely or partially gazetted as national monuments since 1987. To provide an overview of the shifts in colonial heritage conservation discourse, this comparative study has been divided into two main sections, organised according to chronological order. The first section looks at the preservation and promotion of Raffles Hotel and Goodwood Park Hotel’s Tower Block as national monuments in the context of a fundamental shift in conservation priorities from the mid-1980s. It highlights how colonial nostalgia was implicitly or explicitly promoted by the state as well as private developers to bolster the commercial and historic value of the hotels. The next section focuses on the period from the year Fullerton Building was conserved and repurposed as a luxury hotel in 1997 till the gazetting of Fullerton Hotel as a national monument in 2015. Between the late 1990s to the present period, the idea of ‘colonial heritage’ was increasingly downplayed in conservation and promotional narratives of the Fullerton. This parallels a shift in the focus of our national narrative, which now stresses Singapore’s pre-colonial beginnings and its distinctive post-independence growth and progress. Therefore, by comparatively analysing the official and promotional discourses of these hotels, I contend that changing representations of these grand colonial edifices are often reflective of broader shifts in the scripting of our nation’s history.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/155605
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses

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