Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/154985
Title: EXPLORING AND OPTIMIZING THE NANOPARTICLE-INDUCED ENDOTHELIAL LEAKINESS EFFECT TO SUPPORT THERAPEUTICS
Authors: TEE JIE KAI
ORCID iD:   orcid.org/0000-0002-2232-3279
Keywords: Nanotoxicology, nanomedicine, titanium dioxide nanoparticles, endothelial leakiness, cell-material interaction, liver fibrosis
Issue Date: 11-Jan-2019
Citation: TEE JIE KAI (2019-01-11). EXPLORING AND OPTIMIZING THE NANOPARTICLE-INDUCED ENDOTHELIAL LEAKINESS EFFECT TO SUPPORT THERAPEUTICS. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: The advent of nanotechnology has diversified the use of inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) in various applications. However, their extensive usage has also raised public concerns on their potential toxicity. Recent studies showed that inorganic NPs could promote endothelial leakiness through the disruption of adherens junction proteins, a novel phenomenon coined as nanomaterial-induced endothelial leakiness (NanoEL). Herein, our overarching aim is to explore how this phenomenon can be capitalized to support therapeutics. Using titanium dioxide NPs (TiO2NPs), we first seek to characterize NanoEL and its implication in cancer metastasis. Thereafter, we aim to modulate NanoEL by investigating the activation of anti-permeability protein (Tie2) as an additional control point to regulate endothelial leakiness. Lastly, we investigated NanoEL in the context of liver fibrosis and aim to exploit this phenomenon to promote drug transport for therapeutic purposes. Henceforth, deliberate yet conscientious modulation of endothelial leakiness could serve as an alternative platform to support therapeutics.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/154985
Appears in Collections:Ph.D Theses (Open)

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