Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/154102
Title: CHILDBIRTH SELF-EFFICACY, FEAR OF CHILDBIRTH AND PSYCHOLOGICAL WELL-BEING OF CHILDBEARING WOMEN IN SINGAPORE: A CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY
Authors: SOH YAN XI
Keywords: Childbirth self-efficacy
Fear of childbirth
Psychological well-being
Childbirth
Issue Date: 25-May-2019
Citation: SOH YAN XI (2019-05-25). CHILDBIRTH SELF-EFFICACY, FEAR OF CHILDBIRTH AND PSYCHOLOGICAL WELL-BEING OF CHILDBEARING WOMEN IN SINGAPORE: A CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Aims: To examine the pattern of childbirth self-efficacy, fear of childbirth and psychological well-being with pregnancy trimesters and to investigate the predictors of childbirth self-efficacy among childbearing women in Singapore. Background: Childbirth self-efficacy, fear of childbirth and psychological well-being of expectant women are important factors that facilitate a smooth and positive delivery experience for women. Methods: A descriptive, cross-sectional study using self-reported questionnaire survey was carried out. Study data were collected from a convenience sample of 205 pregnant women between September and December 2018 in a large maternity hospital in Singapore. The instruments, Childbirth Self-Efficacy Inventory, Childbirth Attitudes Questionnaire, and World Health Organization Well-being Index were used to measure childbirth self-efficacy, fear of childbirth and psychological well-being, respectively. Multiple linear regression was used to find the significant predictors of childbirth self-efficacy. Results: Overall, pregnant women in the first trimester reported the highest level of childbirth fear (40.5 ± 11.1 [mean ± standard deviation]) and lowest level of psychological well-being (54.9 ± 22.1). Whereas, the lowest level of childbirth self-efficacy (96.8 ± 30.5) was found in the third trimester. Significant correlations were found between childbirth self-efficacy, fear of childbirth and psychological well-being. Chinese, parity, fear of childbirth and psychological well-being were found to be the main predictors of childbirth self-efficacy. Conclusion: The finding of this study highlights the predictive relationship between childbirth self-efficacy with fear of childbirth, psychological well-being, ethnicity and parity among pregnant women. Implications: Nurses and midwives should routinely assess childbirth self-efficacy, childbirth fear and well-being of pregnant women as early as they come in for their antenatal check-ups at the clinic. It is essential for healthcare professionals to develop culturally appropriate individualized antenatal educational programs to support and prepare pregnant women, especially nulliparas, with the upcoming birth.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/154102
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses

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