Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/154101
Title: SUBJECTIVE SLEEP QUALITY AMONG HOSPITALIZED ADULT PATIENTS: AN OBSERVATIONAL, CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY
Authors: SITI NADIAH BTE ARMAN
Keywords: Hospital
Medical
Sleep Quality
Noise
Nursing
Issue Date: 25-May-2019
Citation: SITI NADIAH BTE ARMAN (2019-05-25). SUBJECTIVE SLEEP QUALITY AMONG HOSPITALIZED ADULT PATIENTS: AN OBSERVATIONAL, CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Background: Sleep is a state of quiescence that aids in a series of vital restorative processes. Individuals admitted into the hospital commonly experience poor sleep quality attributed to multifactorial sleep disturbances, adversely affecting their recovery and rehabilitation. Aims: To assess the overall sleep quality of adult inpatients in medical general wards and examine their subjective sleep quality and its’ associations with sociodemographical, clinical and extrinsic environmental factors. Methods: This observational, cross-sectional study used convenience sampling and measured sleep quality of participants using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and the Richards-Campbell Sleep Questionnaire (RCSQ). Participants’ sleep quality were categorised into three groups: ‘optimal’, ‘average’ and ‘poor’. Level of noise was recorded using a sound meter. Eligible inpatients (N=52) were recruited from two medical general wards in a tertiary hospital in Singapore between July 2018 to December 2018. The following statistical methods were used to analyse the data: Independent t-test, One-way ANOVA and Pearsons’ Chi- squared test. Results: Participants reported ‘average’ overall sleep quality during hospitalization (M=5.83, SD=2.31). Results also revealed that inpatients’ subjective sleep quality were not affected by their socio-demographical or clinical factors. However, participants who were exposed to night lamps during their sleeping period reported a reduction in sleep quality (p=0.04). Noise levels measured within study wards ranged from 42.7dB to 81.2dB, exceeding WHO recommended levels of <40 dB. Implications/Conclusion: Inpatient sleep quality is greatly reduced when exposed to several extrinsic factors. Hence, it is pivotal for hospitals to look into improving acoustics and lighting patterns within general wards to improve patients’ overall sleep quality. Awareness programs should also be conducted for healthcare workers to promote a quiet culture in hospitals.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/154101
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses

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