Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/154094
Title: MOTHERS’ KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDES, AND PRACTICES ON TOILET TRAINING OF THEIR CHILDREN IN SINGAPORE
Authors: REBEKAH RAMACHANDRAN
Keywords: Toilet Training
Mothers
Children
Issue Date: 25-May-2019
Citation: REBEKAH RAMACHANDRAN (2019-05-25). MOTHERS’ KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDES, AND PRACTICES ON TOILET TRAINING OF THEIR CHILDREN IN SINGAPORE. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Aims: The study aimed to identify mothers' knowledge, attitudes, and practices on the toilet training of their children in Singapore. Background: Over the years, changes in caregivers’ knowledge, attitudes, and practices in toilet training have resulted in the age of toilet training being progressively postponed. Later completion of toilet training can cause further medical and behavioural issues. With more mothers in the workforce and multiple caregivers being involved in caregiving, it is essential to identify the Singaporean mother’s knowledge, attitudes, and practices. Design: A cross-sectional descriptive research design was adopted. Methods: English-speaking mothers with children between the ages of 1 to 6 years were recruited through convenience sampling over a 3-month period. 300 participants were recruited across 3 outpatient paediatric clinics in KKH. Selfadministered survey questionnaires were used for data collection. Pearson Chi- Square Tests were used to analyse the relationship between mothers’ demographics and her knowledge and practices in toilet training. Results: Most mothers were unable to correctly identify readiness signs in toilet training. Most also disagreed that delayed toilet training would bring negative consequences to the child’s health. Mothers also adopted a variety of practices in toilet training which was guided by the developmental readiness signs shown by the child. Mothers’ ethnicity, employment status and marital status was significantly associated with knowledge and practices in toilet training. Conclusion: Mothers, who are increasingly burdened by work commitments and the uncertainties of child-rearing, should be well-guided in their actions and decisions. Future studies could consider exploring toilet training in an interventional study or a prospective cohort study to identify causal relationships in greater detail. Implications: Identifying the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of mothers, will allow a better understanding of the mothers’ needs and uncertainties so various support programmes can be developed to educate mothers in Singapore.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/154094
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses

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