Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/153856
Title: PERSPECTIVES REGARDING SEXUAL HEALTH EDUCATION AMONGST NURSES AND PATIENTS IN THE GYNAECOLOGY WARDS OF A SINGAPORE TERTIARY HOSPITAL : A DESCRIPTIVE QUALITATIVE STUDY.
Authors: HON XIN PING
Keywords: nurse
nursing patient
female sexual dysfunction
sex education
sex counselling
sexual health education
attitude
experience
meaning
perception
understanding
views
impacts
benefits
barriers
needs
expectation
Issue Date: 25-May-2019
Citation: HON XIN PING (2019-05-25). PERSPECTIVES REGARDING SEXUAL HEALTH EDUCATION AMONGST NURSES AND PATIENTS IN THE GYNAECOLOGY WARDS OF A SINGAPORE TERTIARY HOSPITAL : A DESCRIPTIVE QUALITATIVE STUDY.. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Background. Despite intensions to a holistic practice, the scarce attention rendered towards sexual health leads to the neglection of patients’ sexual healthcare needs. Research studies on sexual health in Singapore are found to be lacking, and local perspectives related to SHE in hospitals are not well understood. Aims. To explore the perceptions of gynecology nurses and patients towards SHE delivery in hospitals. Method. Employing a descriptive qualitative approach, individual face-to-face interviews was conducted with 15 nurses and 15 patients from two gynaecology wards. Purposive sampling of participants was performed until data saturation was achieved. Thematic analysis was used to identify the consistent core themes. Triangulation of information from both groups was done to demonstrate data credibility and dependability. Results. The five themes which transpired from the nurses’ narratives were: (1) nurses’ perception on SHE, (2) what nurses think about patients receiving SHE, (3) barriers to provide SHE, and (4) wish list regarding SHE provision. For patients, their five themes included: (1) patients’ perception on SHE, (2) reasons to seek SHE, (3) what patients think about nurses providing SHE, (4) barriers to seek SHE, and (5) wish list regarding receiving SHE. Subsequent cross analysis revealed three converging themes: (1) patients’ and nurses’ perception on SHE, (2) barriers to provide SHE, and (3) wish list regarding SHE. Conclusion. While gynecology nurses and patients did see the importance in SHE, they held many uncertainties and assumptions on sexuality and SHE which impeded its delivery. Both sides perceived discomfort in sexuality discussions, and the nurses’ inadequate aptitude to perform SHE. Findings from this study may assist the development of specialized SHE education programs, trainings or resources and guide further research of other longitudinal study designs.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/153856
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses

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