Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/153837
Title: EXPLORING NURSES’ PERCEPTIONS OF DIFFICULT PATIENTS AND COPING STRATEGIES USED DURING THE MANAGEMENT OF DIFFICULT PATIENTS IN MEDICAL-SURGICAL WARDS IN SINGAPORE.
Authors: CHOO JIE LING
Keywords: Difficult patients
Nurses
Medical-surgical
Perception
Impact
Coping Strategies
Challenges
Improvements
Issue Date: 25-May-2019
Citation: CHOO JIE LING (2019-05-25). EXPLORING NURSES’ PERCEPTIONS OF DIFFICULT PATIENTS AND COPING STRATEGIES USED DURING THE MANAGEMENT OF DIFFICULT PATIENTS IN MEDICAL-SURGICAL WARDS IN SINGAPORE.. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Background Encounters with difficult patients can have adverse effects on nurses’ emotional health and work performance, leading to impaired nurse-patient relationships and patient care. While several programs equipping healthcare providers to manage difficult patients are available, reports of encounters with difficult patients have increased over the years. Furthermore, minimal research has been conducted in Singapore. Aims and objectives This study aims to explore nurses’ experiences with difficult patients, and investigate nurses’ perceptions of difficult patients, impacts of difficult patients, and coping strategies utilized by nurses. Design A descriptive qualitative study design was utilized. Methods A purposive sampling of 16 participants, inclusive of registered nurses only, was recruited from the medical-surgical wards of Raffles Hospital, a private healthcare provider in Singapore. Using data collected from face-to-face semi-structured interviews, thematic analysis of the transcribed verbatim was conducted. Results Upon data analysis, five themes emerged from the findings namely, (1) nurses’ perceptions of difficult patients; (2) impact on nurses; (3) nurses’ self-coping strategies; (4) perceived support resources available and (5) challenges faced and suggestions for improvement. Participants perceived patients who were verbally or physically aggressive, uncooperative and demanding to be difficult. Managing difficult patients affected nurses’ psychological and physical health. Participants adopted avoidance-oriented, task-oriented and emotion-oriented coping strategies. In addition, they received support from the hospital management, colleagues, friends and family during and after encounters with difficult patients. Participants also shared the challenges that they faced during the management of difficult patients, and provided suggestions for improvement. ! 2! Conclusion With greater insight into the experiences of nurses and coping strategies during the management of difficult patients, improvements could be made within hospitals and the current nursing curriculum such that formal training and support would be available in the future.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/153837
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses

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