Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/153836
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dc.titleEXPERIENCE OF NURSES WORKING IN DEMENTIA-PALLIATIVE CARE WARD --- A DESCRIPTIVE QUALITATIVE STUDY
dc.contributor.authorCHONG SHING CHEN
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-08T08:08:21Z
dc.date.available2019-05-08T08:08:21Z
dc.date.issued2019-05-25
dc.identifier.citationCHONG SHING CHEN (2019-05-25). EXPERIENCE OF NURSES WORKING IN DEMENTIA-PALLIATIVE CARE WARD --- A DESCRIPTIVE QUALITATIVE STUDY. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/153836
dc.description.abstractBackground: Dementia patients often require complex nursing care and have significant healthcare needs at the later stage of the disease. There have been increased calls worldwide to extend palliative care services to include person with dementia (PWD). In Singapore, inpatient hospice care was not available for PWD until recent years. This study allowed an understanding of the experiences of nurses providing dementia-palliative caregiving, provided insights on perceived barriers and facilitators in dementia-caregiving, and enhanced understanding on how to improve nurses’ work life. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the experience of nurses providing dementia-palliative caregiving in an inpatient hospice ward. Methods: To describe the phenomenon under investigation, descriptive qualitative research design was used. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a total of 12 Registered Nurses in dementia-palliative care ward of Assisi Hospice. Purposive sampling method was used, and data was analysed using thematic analysis method. Findings: Four primary themes emerged from the analysis: (1) Challenges encountered; (2) Navigating the difficult journey; (3) Learning and workplace culture; (4) The way forward. Meeting family needs were perceived as the greatest challenge by nurses in this study, followed by behavioural symptoms of PWD and manpower issues. Although nurses were confident in physical symptoms (eg. pain, breathlessness) assessment and management, they sometimes found themselves struggling with management of behavioural viii symptoms of PWD. Nonetheless, volunteering programme, nurses’ positive attitudes, teamwork as well as supportive leaderships allowed nurses to meet these challenges and to deliver person-centred care without experiencing burnout. Conclusions: Both nurses’ attributes and care environment are essential in delivery of person-centred care. Nurses in dementia-palliative care should have positive attitudes such as compassion. A conducive care environment with effective leadership style, positive staff-staff relationships and opportunities for nursing professional growth are also needed for delivery of person-centred care.
dc.subjectdementia
dc.subjectpalliative care
dc.subjecthospice
dc.subjectexperiences
dc.subjectqualitative method
dc.typeThesis
dc.contributor.departmentNURSING/ALICE LEE CTR FOR NURSING STUD
dc.contributor.supervisorCHOW YEOW LENG
dc.description.degreeBachelor's
dc.description.degreeconferredBachelor of Science (Nursing)(Honours)
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses

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