Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/153784
Title: UNDERGRADUATE NURSING STUDENTS’ PERCEIVED BARRIERS TO THE USE OF PHYSICAL ASSESSMENT: A DESCRIPTIVE EXPLORATORY STUDY
Authors: MAVIS TAN WEITING
Keywords: Physical assessment
nursing assessment
nursing education
undergraduate nursing
Issue Date: 25-May-2019
Citation: MAVIS TAN WEITING (2019-05-25). UNDERGRADUATE NURSING STUDENTS’ PERCEIVED BARRIERS TO THE USE OF PHYSICAL ASSESSMENT: A DESCRIPTIVE EXPLORATORY STUDY. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Background: Physical assessment represents a stride towards greater nursing autonomy and is a fundamental element of nursing care. However, studies have shown that these skills are not routinely performed in clinical practice. This has prompted the need to identify barriers influencing the transfer of physical assessment knowledge to nursing practice, particularly for undergraduate nursing students dealing with a content-laden curriculum. Aims: This study sought to explore and compare the perceived barriers to physical assessment among undergraduate nursing students in Singapore Methods: An exploratory descriptive quantitative study was conducted in a local university. 303 undergraduate second-, third- and fourth-year nursing students were recruited. The 38-item Barriers to Nurses’ Use of Physical Assessment Scale was administered. Descriptive statistics and one-way ANOVA were used for data analysis. Results: Specialty care and lack of confidence emerged as the top barriers to physical assessment, while influence on patient care emerged as the least influential barrier. Year 4s were significantly more likely to perceive lack of time and interruptions as barriers. Lack of role-modelling and ward cultures were also notable deterrents. Reliance on doctors and monitoring devices for physical assessment, though not significant barriers, were still evident amongst students. Nursing students appreciated the value of physical assessment, but were unsure of how they could be used effectively in their care. Conclusions: A restructuring of undergraduate physical assessment curriculum is indicated, involving a fundamental shift from the biomedical framework traditionally used. Greater emphasis on core skills relevant to the initiation of nursing interventions is required, together with accompanying critical thinking and clinical reasoning skills. The “Core + Cluster” model may be useful in clinical practice for defining a set of essential skills across different specialty areas, and ward cultures promoting the use of physical assessment must be fostered.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/153784
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses

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