Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/153242
Title: TWO COLONIAL MINDS : A STUDY OF RICHARD WINSTEDT'S PERCEPTIONS OF THE MALAYS AND VICTOR PURCELL'S PERCEPTIONS OF THE CHINESE
Authors: HASIM BIN HASAN
Keywords: Winstedt
Richard Olaf
Sir
1878-1966
Purcell
Victor
Malays (Asian people)
Chinese Southeast Asia
Issue Date: 1995
Citation: HASIM BIN HASAN (1995). TWO COLONIAL MINDS : A STUDY OF RICHARD WINSTEDT'S PERCEPTIONS OF THE MALAYS AND VICTOR PURCELL'S PERCEPTIONS OF THE CHINESE. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: This honours thesis examines Richard Winstedt's perceptions of the Malays and Victor Purcell's perceptions of the Chinese. It discusses Winstedt's and Purcell's creation of romantic images of the Malays and the Chinese respectively. As much as they were influenced by their cultural traditions, Winstedt's and Purcell's perceptions were shaped by their personal sympathies for these two communities and therefore, were peculiarly individual. Despite being individual, these romantic images reflected the power relationship between the coloniser and the colonised. They also acted as an intellectual justification for continued colonial rule. During the period of rapid socio-economic changes in the early twentieth century Malaya, these images served as blinkers to exclude these changes from Winstedt's and Purcell's conceptions of the two communities. This exclusion amounted to a denial of the need to meet the attendant political and economic demands made by the two communities. In denying the communities their demands, Winstedt and Purcell mirrored perfectly the colonial strategy of that time. While the colonial imperatives might have been influential, their acquiescence arose from their personal convictions about these communities. In the postwar period, with the promise of eventual self-government and the removal of the colonial framework, Winstedt's and Purcell's perceptions were influential in directing their political activism to champion their respective communities. Their actions, the author would argue, were clearly motivated by the static romantic images they had of the two communities. It was their last attempt at ensuring that their romantic images of the two communities survived them. In the final analysis, the author would argue, Winstedt and Purcell, despite their professed admiration for the two communities, were still colonialists at heart.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/153242
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses

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