Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/153145
Title: A CRITICAL EXAMINATION OF LANGUAGE PLANNING POLICIES IN SINGAPORE FROM 1950 TO DATE
Authors: DALJIT KAUR
Issue Date: 1983
Citation: DALJIT KAUR (1983). A CRITICAL EXAMINATION OF LANGUAGE PLANNING POLICIES IN SINGAPORE FROM 1950 TO DATE. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: This dissertation deals with an examination of language planning policies in Singapore from 1950 to date with particular reference to one minority group - the Malays. Chapter One outlines the situation in Singapore and is divided into three parts : I The first part depicts the sociolinguistic profile of Singapore reflecting the existence of multi ethnicity and multilingualism. Malay, probably Bazaar Malay, and especially English are presently the two linguae francae of Singapore. Languages and dialects are classified as major or minor languages following Ferguson's format, and a Literary Index based on Eddie Kuo's Communicativity Index provides information on official languages used for inter- or intra-group communication. II The second part explains the reasons for the existence of multilingualism and multi ethnicity. During British rule residence was along ethnic linear which stood in the way of integration and harmony. When Singapore became independent a massive resettlement plan was initiated. People of different ethnic groups now live in close proximity, thereby requiring a more effective means of communication. III Part three deals with the reliance on English language and an English-medium education because of Singapore's industrial development. To counter-act the ill-effects of a western life-style, the government launched a bilingual policy with the hope that the 'mother tongues', studied as second languages, would equip Singaporeans with favorable Asian values. An examination of the language planning policies, reflected mainly through the education system, is dealt with in Chapter Two. This includes a diachronic study of policies from 1950 to date. Chapter Three refers particularly to the Malay language and the opinions and attitudes of 120 Malays to language policies in Singapore. The rising and waning of Malay is the result of political considerations. Three groups of Malays - parents, teachers, and students who answered a questionnaire on language use and language policy - confirm the importance of English, Malay belongs basically to the family domain. Respondents reacted favorably to the bilingual policy but a substantial number feel that English rather than Malay should be the National Language. Chapter Four deals with concluding remarks and some suggestions regarding language policies. The promotion of Malay is felt necessary considering the geographical position of Singapore, and the constant expression of the desire by the Singapore for a closer relationship with Malaysia.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/153145
Appears in Collections:Master's Theses (Restricted)

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