Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/2041712
Title: Slip line theory based stability analysis on the influence of deep excavation on adjacent slope
Authors: Zhou A.
Li C.
Jiang P.
Yao K. 
Li N.
Wang W.
Issue Date: 2018
Publisher: Hindawi Limited
Citation: Zhou A., Li C., Jiang P., Yao K., Li N., Wang W. (2018). Slip line theory based stability analysis on the influence of deep excavation on adjacent slope. Mathematical Problems in Engineering 2018 : 2041712. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/2041712
Abstract: The impact of deep excavation to the stability of adjacent slope is evaluated based on the slip line theory. Stress field of slope under various excavation conditions is simulated by finite element method, while slip line field is determined by non-associated flow rule. Factor of safety is obtained by integrating the skid-resistance and the shear stress on each slip line, and the slip line with minimum factor of safety corresponds to the critical slip surface. Two typical displacement constraint boundaries are considered. The results indicate that the critical slip surface moves towards to the slope surface and develops downwards. The factor of safety decreases with the excavation process. For flexible displacement constraint boundary, large deformation of supporting pile causes obvious variation of critical slip surface and factor of safety. In terms of the stiff displacement constraint boundary with internal supports, deep excavation only has limited effect on the slope stability. ? 2018 Aizhao Zhou et al.
Source Title: Mathematical Problems in Engineering
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/152643
ISSN: 1024123X
DOI: 10.1155/2018/2041712
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications
Elements

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormatAccess SettingsVersion 
2041712.pdf1.81 MBAdobe PDF

OPEN

NoneView/Download

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

1
checked on Jul 4, 2020

Page view(s)

111
checked on Jul 3, 2020

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.