Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1002/brb3.1009
DC FieldValue
dc.titleImpact of brain-derived neurotrophic factor genetic polymorphism on cognition: A systematic review
dc.contributor.authorToh Y.L.
dc.contributor.authorNg T.
dc.contributor.authorTan M.
dc.contributor.authorTan A.
dc.contributor.authorChan A.
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-21T05:58:23Z
dc.date.available2019-03-21T05:58:23Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.citationToh Y.L., Ng T., Tan M., Tan A., Chan A. (2018). Impact of brain-derived neurotrophic factor genetic polymorphism on cognition: A systematic review. Brain and Behavior 8 (7) : 1-14. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1002/brb3.1009
dc.identifier.issn21623279
dc.identifier.urihttp://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/152506
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has an important role in the neurogenesis and neuroplasticity of the brain. This systematic review was designed to examine the association between BDNF Val66Met (rs6265) polymorphism and four cognitive domains—attention and concentration, executive function, verbal fluency, and memory, respectively. Methodology: Primary literature search was performed using search engines such as PubMed and Scopus. Observational studies that evaluated the neurocognitive performances in relation to BDNF polymorphism within human subjects were included in this review, while animal studies, overlapping studies, and meta-analysis were excluded. Results: Forty of 82 reviewed studies (48.8%) reported an association between Val66Met polymorphism and neurocognitive domains. The proportion of the studies showing positive findings in cognitive performances between Val/Val homozygotes and Met carriers was comparable, at 30.5% and 18.3%, respectively. The highest percentage of positive association between Val66Met polymorphism and neurocognition was reported under the memory domain, with 26 of 63 studies (41.3%), followed by 18 of 47 studies (38.3%) under the executive function domain and four of 23 studies (17.4%) under the attention and concentration domain. There were no studies showing an association between Val66Met polymorphism and verbal fluency. In particular, Val/Val homozygotes performed better in tasks related to the memory domain, while Met carriers performed better in terms of executive function, in both healthy individuals and clinical populations. Conclusion: While numerous studies report an association between Val66Met polymorphism and neurocognitive changes in executive function and memory domains, the effect of Met allele has not been clearly established. © 2018 The Authors. Brain and Behavior published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
dc.publisherJohn Wiley and Sons Ltd
dc.sourceScopus
dc.subjectattention; brain-derived neurotrophic factor; executive control; memory; neuroprotection
dc.typeReview
dc.contributor.departmentDEPT OF PHARMACY
dc.description.doi10.1002/brb3.1009
dc.description.sourcetitleBrain and Behavior
dc.description.volume8
dc.description.issue7
dc.description.page1-14
dc.published.statepublished
dc.grant.idNMRC/CIRG/1471/2017
dc.grant.idNMRC/CIRG/1386/2014
dc.grant.fundingagencyNMRC, National Medical Research Council
dc.grant.fundingagencyNMRC, National Medical Research Council
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications
Elements

Show simple item record
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormatAccess SettingsVersion 
brb3.1009.pdf647.15 kBAdobe PDF

OPEN

NoneView/Download

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

7
checked on May 18, 2019

Page view(s)

8
checked on May 13, 2019

Download(s)

1
checked on May 13, 2019

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.